Archive

Why I study - Interthinking

Neil Mercer

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After the facts

Guest Editor Ray Bull introduces a special issue on the contribution of forensic psychology to helping the police get the truth...and nothing but the truth.

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Bullies – Thugs or thinkers?

At the Centenary Annual Conference Jon Sutton described the work that won him the 1999 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology.

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Is a jumper angrier than a tree?

Amanda Waterman, Mark Blades and Christopher Spencer ask nonsensical questions – but their research has serious implications for anyone who interviews children.

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Objects, affordances...action!

At the 2000 London Conference Glyn Humphreys gave his Presidents’ Award Lecture on the cognitive neuroscience of action selection.

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How do European and US psychology differ?

Michael W. Eysenck offers his viewpoint on the differences between European and American psychology; Neil Martin on why and how European publishers are taking on the American heavyweights; Monique Anderson interviews Tuomo Tikkanen, President of the European Federation of Professional Psychologists Associations (EFPPA), to hear about European psychology and the role of EFPPA within it.

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Why I study...Geniuses

Michael J.A. Howe

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A Brief History of the Society Logo

Hannah Steinberg is Professor Emeritus of Psychopharmacology,University College London, and Visiting Professor, Middlesex University.

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Interview with Alison Bourchier

Was there a scary monster under your bed? Did you have an imaginary friend when you were growing up? Angus Smyth spoke to Alison Bourchier about children’s understanding of pretence and reality.

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Psychology - A science for society

Kate Cavanagh reports.

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Serial order in short-term memory

Richard Henson, winner of the 1998 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology.

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Brought to book?

John Radford argues that academic authors are not adequately remunerated for their contributions to publishing. Joyce Collins explains the economics of book publishing and considers reward for academic activity in general.

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