Archive

Towards the new millennium

The new millennium does not, strictly speaking, begin until 1 January 2001. But it’s clear that in the public’s view the change in the calendar from 1999 to 2000 is the big psychological event. So here we present some thoughts from various perspectives on why many people see the year 2000 as so significant …

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Why I study...the psychology of the common cold

Andy Smith

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Speaking clearly before the tone...

Richard Hammersley describes some recorded message styles.

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Music — where cognition and emotion meet

John Sloboda gave the Presidents’ Award Lecture at the Society’s Annual Conference in Belfast, April 1999. He argued that millions of people could discover the joys of music making if we created modern equivalents of the village brass band and stopped focusing on the need to be best.

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In the presence of a great psychologist - Boris Semeonoff

Tommy MacKay recorded what may have been the last interview with Boris Semeonoff; on the first anniversary of his death, we publish part of that interview here.

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Education and the disadvantaged: Is there any justice?

Tommy MacKay argues for radical change in the principles and funding of the British educational system. This article is based on his Award for Challenging Inequality of Opportunity Lecture given at the Society’s Annual Conference, March 1998.

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Eyewitness testimony and the Oklahoma bombing

Amina Memon and Daniel B. Wright ask what psychological studies can tell us about the search for the shadowy ‘John Doe 2’.

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A case for inclusion

Guest Editors Chris Hatton, Richard Hastings and Arlene Vetere introduce a special feature on learning disabilities and mental health, initiated by the North West of England Branch.

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The horrors' of scientific research

Sally Johnson gives an account of her attempts to deal with the methodological problems of a qualitative study.

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Why I study...Social skills

Michael Argyle

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Publish and perish

Michael Gruneberg discusses some negative influences of the Research Assessment Exercise.

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Feeling and smiling

Rob Briner gives an overview of what we currently know about emotion in the workplace.

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