...features

Eli J. Finkel on how the key to forgiveness may lie in our beliefs about romantic destiny.

Frequently, romantic relationships are effortless and pleasurable. Affection is deep, passion is strong, and laughter is pervasive. Unfortunately, most of us will on occasion be victims of partner...

Barry R. Komisaruk, Carlos Beyer and Beverly Whipple view the subject of orgasms as an experience that is an integration of body, nervous system and the mind.

Why should recent findings about orgasm be of interest to psychologists? If psychologists are interested in the bases of pleasure and pain – in altered states of consciousness, in psychological...

Ingrid Schoon and Mel Bartley look at the impact of growing up in poverty

What socio-economic, biological and psychological circumstances contribute to human capability and resilience over the life course? This article reports findings from a research network funded by...

Tim Wildschut, Constantine Sedikides and Clay Routledge offer a historical and psychological account

Nostalgia is an emotion that is experienced by almost everyone (Boym, 2001). But what exactly is the content of nostalgia, when is it elicited, and what does it do for the individual? Until...

S. Alexander Haslam and Stephen D. Reicher re-examine the established view, in an article based on the 2007 Argyle Lecture

There is a widespread consensus amongst psychologists that tyranny triumphs either because ordinary people blindly follow orders or else because they mindlessly conform to powerful roles. However...

Christian Jarrett on the ‘dark underbelly’ of psychology. Could the use of client feedback be the answer?

Marion Kloep and Leo Hendry on how older people discuss and deal with retirement

With the societal changes and shifts of the last few decades, the elderly population of the UK now matches the numbers of teenagers (Coleman & Schofield, 2005). Does this change in the...

John McAlaney and John McMahon on psychology's role in defining and tackling binge drinking

If media reports are to be believed, binge drinking is an increasingly popular pastime of the British public – particularly amongst teenagers and young adults. But how prevalent is it? Figures...

Buxin Han and Kan Zhang with the latest in our international series

Peter Warr with his framework for research and practice

Happiness is very important to us, professionally as well as personally. In personal terms, we all seek to achieve happiness in some way; for many people, it is the basis of a ‘good life’. Happy...

Chris Athanasiades and Allan Winthrop on the role of psychological support in promoting wellbeing at work.

Psychology has for sometime maintained an interest in the promotion of psychological wellbeing in the workplace. Peter Warr’s seminal work (see Warr, 1996) in the 90s has enabled our conceptual...

Perfectionism

The stereotypical student sleeps till midday, leaves dishes in the sink for days on end, and is in far greater danger of playing too hard than working too hard. But for many students the drive to...

Research as a voyage of discovery

Brady Wagoner, Alex Gillespie and Gerard Duveen on an internet archive of Bartlett's work, and how he may have viewed it

Martin Graff writes on another dimension in infidelity

Scott Seider, Katie Davis and Howard Gardner with a new paradigm for considering ethical dilemmas and quality in psychology

Philip J. Corr's Eysenck Memorial Lecture from 2007.

To celebrate the 100th issue of the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest, the editor Christian Jarrett asked some of the world’s top psychologists to put their thinking caps on – and cast practicalities and ethics aside.

Here we present a selection of the responses. For full versions, and for contributions from Alex Haslam, Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Richard Gregory and Society President Pam Maras, see...

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore's Spearman Medal Lecture

It has been known for many decades that the brain undergoes critical periods of development during the early years. However, only recently has it been discovered that brain development does not...

Paul V. Greenall and Melissa Marselle report on an issue of potential significance to any psychologist engaged in sensitive research

We went into his office and he had just picked up the phone to call his wife and there was a roar; I mean a roar! And we looked up and it was the aeroplane coming right at us, the second plane....

Mark J. Forshaw argues that it is time to…

As we are all aware, psychology has changed, throughout its short life. It is possible to identify trends in its history. It has been through periods dominated by introspection and philosophical...

Tom Farsides with a review of the evidence and how we might foster a more prosocial society.

Where’d all the good people go?
I’ve been changing channels;
I don’t see them on the TV shows.
Where’d all the good people go?
We got heaps and heaps of what we sow.
...

Lisa Henderson and Fiona Duff give a full account of the day.

Earlier this year, a Festschrift was held at the Royal Society in London to celebrate the outstanding contributions that Professor Uta Frith has made to Psychology over the past 40 years. A...

Chris Hackley feels that a modern understanding of the psychology involved in marketing can help us to critically engage with it.

Psychology is put to many uses beyond the discipline. In marketing, these can be especially controversial. In 1957 Vance Packard’s Hidden Persuaders described how the marketing industry used depth...

Mark Burton and Carolyn Kagan on how organised psychology should respond.

How can organised psychology best promote and protect human rights in relation to military occupation and the detention of terrorist suspects or insurgents?