...features

Tomás Chamorro-Premuzic and Adrian Furnham look to understand, assess and predict individual differences in achievement.

Most applied psychologists – clinical, educational, organisational – feel the need to use cognitive ability tests for specific diagnostic purposes or educational and personnel selection. However...

Andrew J. Hill examines the evidence concerning the psychosocial consequences of childhood obesity.

Obesity is now firmly on the UK’s health agenda, and children are increasingly the number one priority. Those already overweight or obese need immediate and expert help. Those who are not are...

Stuart Biddle and Trish Gorely investigate.

'The kids of today! Too much telly and texting – it’s making them fat!’ is a common refrain in the media and in general conversation. Indeed, the strong rise in obesity in young people over...

Peter Forster introduces the latest in our international series – but with a difference.

WheN The Psychologist began its series of international articles, I was working in Vanuatu, a Y-shaped chain of 80 inhabited islands between Fiji to the east and Queensland, Australia, to the west...

As pressure grows on food advertisers, Jason C.G. Halford looks at the evidence.

In response to our special issue Gustav Jahoda sets out a different historical analysis of cross-cultural psychology and finds the concepts of ‘indigenous psychology’ and ‘universal psychology’ hard to pin down.

IN their February special issue ‘Bringing psychology to all societies’, the three contributors (Ingrid Lunt, Kwang-Kuo Hwang and Carl Martin Allwood) dealt with some important though controversial...

Stephen Joseph interviews Professor David Lane, Chair of the BPS Register of Psychologists Specialising in Psychotherapy, about psychotherapy and the establishment of this new professional route within the BPS.

Jane Ogden argues that psychological solutions are not always best.

Obesity is mainly seen by health professionals as a psychological problem relating to beliefs and two key behaviours – overeating and underactivity. As a result, obesity has traditionally been...

Paul Chadwick and Helen Croker on why psychological intervention is the best option.

AS anyone who has tried to lose weight will know, it is not easy. Rely on willpower or calorie counting alone, and try as you might you can’t squeeze into that smaller size. But surely some...

Jane Wardle on how environments, genes and behaviour interact to cause obesity – and what psychologists can do about it.

Obesity is associated with serious health risks. The odds
of contracting diabetes, coronary heart disease, cancer and arthritis are markedly higher in obese than in normal-weight adults (...

Psychologist editor Jon Sutton introduces part one of a special feature.

There are few issues that genuinely touch both the working and everyday lives of the majority of our readers, but obesity is one. Several different types of psychologist – health, social, sport...

Steve Duck with a new model of relationship breakup.

If you have never experienced relationship breakup, then there is a place reserved for you in the psychological equivalent of Madame Tussauds. Yet despite the ubiquity of the experiences of...

Tatsuya Sato and Yoh Fumino with the latest in our international series.

IN the 17th century Japan was isolated by its geographical location and its government. The Tokugawa Shogunate feared the spread of Christianity and decided to trade only with China and Holland....

Paul Marsden and Sharon Attia on the psychology of suicide bombing and the role of the media.

EXPLOSIVES strapped to his waist, Hussam Abdo faced the Israeli soldiers, and the camera. The Palestinian teenager had just become a global media celebrity: the ‘Boy Bomber’ of Nablus (see tinyurl...

Martin Roiser examines different ways of estimating public opinion and asks how views change after group discussions.

Early one October morning at the time of the war in Afghanistan, I was listening to the radio. The newscaster wondered why opinion polls revealed a public in favour of British intervention in...

The Psychologist’s editor, Jon Sutton, presents the results of a Society investigation.

PSYCHOLOGY – telling you things you already know in words you don’t understand. Over the years I’ve heard that a lot; from friends and family, journalists, even from other psychologists. Wouldn’t...

Rodger Ll. Wood discusses how head injury can affect personal relationships.

Do you know what it feels like for me to wake up every morning, look at the man in bed next to me, and wish it was the man I married, not the monster I live with now?

Alex Hossack and Gemma Wall ask whether we’re still ignoring vital allies in our practice.

AS psychologists, many of us go through years of training and supervision in order to help others through their problems. But if you were an alcoholic, or suffering with depression, wouldn’t you...

Carl Martin Allwood discusses some of the practical problems with taking an indigenous approach.

WE would all like our work to be relevant and useful to society, and psychology is fulfilling at least some of its promise in this respect. But the way psychology is going about realising its true...

Kwang-Kuo Hwang shows how psychological study has been inextricably linked with sociocultural history.

Since the end of World War II there have been three large-scale academic movements attempting to incorporate non-Western cultural factors into psychological research: modernisation theory,...

Ingrid Lunt on achievements and challenges in the international organisation of psychology.

Although American psychology continues to occupy a dominant position in most of the world, there
is an increasing awareness in many countries of the need to develop psychology as a science...

Guest Editors Manfusa Shams and Paul Jackson introduce the special issue.

Since the first laboratory experiments by Wilhelm Wundt in 1898, psychology has developed rapidly. No longer reliant on the white-coated Prof studying rats or, at best, students in a lab,...

Frank Tallis asks whether psychologists should take lovesickness more seriously.

Truly, madly, deeply. If you haven’t actually said those words, you’ve probably thought them – and they are very revealing. They suggest that, as a society, we consider ‘madness’ to be as...

Keith Gaynor with the first in an occasional series giving a psychological perspective on fictional characters.

In J.D. Salinger’s book The Catcher in the Rye (1951) Holden Caulfield struggles through the beginnings of a mental breakdown over several traumatic days in New York. Finally he begins to recount...

Judy Dunn kicks off the Society’s ‘Year of Relationships’ with a look at children’s relationships with their non-resident fathers.

WHEN parents separate, most children end up living with their mothers. With the rapid rise in parental separation and divorce over the last two decades, this means that increasing numbers of...