...features

Lindsay O’Dell, Guida de Abreu and Sarah O’Toole look at the role of culture in psychology.

World events since 11 September 2001 have brought the need for understanding of cultural difference to the fore. Psychologists have a major part to play addressing issues such as identity,...

John Archer argues that social constructionist research favours politically biased interpretations of discursive material, at the expense of a large body of empirical evidence.

The difference between boys and girls or men and women fascinates the public and the academic community alike, and there is a vast amount of theoretically driven and empirically based research on...

Gwyneth Doherty-Sneddon on the importance of children’s eye gaze.

What was the name of your first headteacher? Stop and think for a while... did you just look to the heavens for the answer? During difficult cognitive activity, for example remembering information...

James Hartley argues that an all-too-common failure to report the sex of research participants can limit the usefulness of the findings.

I have always been intrigued as to why some authors of articles in psychology journals do not tell the reader about the numbers of male and female participants in their studies. It seems to me if...

Mary M. Robertson with an update and comment on psychobehavioural therapies.

Your starter for three: What links prominent 18th-century literary figure Dr Samuel Johnson and Manchester United’s new goalkeeper Tim Howard? Answer: Both have been afflicted with Tourette’s...

Mickey Keenan, winner of the Society’s Award for Promoting Equality of Opportunity, writes about his work.

At Colin’s belated 18-months assessment the health visitor expressed a number of concerns about him. He did not respond to the hearing tests, and it was difficult to keep him in the room. The...

Pham Minh Hac and Do Long with the latest in our international series.

Vietnam is a Southeast Asian country with an area of 362,000 square km: roughly the size of Germany. It has a population of about 80 million, comprising 54 ethnic groups. In its long history...

Jay Joseph argues that all the research to date into the genetics of schizophrenia, intelligence and criminal behaviour is so flawed that the results are meaningless. Craig Newnes went to meet him.

Bärbel Knäuper and Norbert Schwarz explain how age-sensitive context effects may lead us astray.

Are older people more concerned about crime than young people? Do our political attitudes become more conservative with age? Do older generations feel differently about abortion than younger...

Steven Schwartz argues that psychology teaching should take heed of psychological research and offer more ‘problem-based learning’.

Studies of learning and cognition have dominated psychology for 150 years. The findings of this research have had important implications for education (Bransford et al., 2000). Yet, psychological...

Adrian J. Scott

Steve Newstead believes psychology can improve
the reliability and validity of student assessment.

A COLLEAGUE recently suggested to me over coffee, only half in jest, that we should completely abandon the assessment of students. He pointed out that we have a good idea of what sort of degree...

Adrian Furnham discusses how psychology can improve the experience for our overseas visitors.

Students have travelled from one country to another for centuries, particularly in Europe. They have often faced problems: an early study in America, published in 1925, listed difficulties for...

Articles by Pasco Fearon (resampling), David Clark-Carter (effect size), Jeremy Miles and Mark Shevlin (structural equation modelling), Andy Field (meta analysis), and Daniel Wright and Sian Williams (reporting results).

Statistics, like any branch of human knowledge, is open to debate and subject to change. However, many psychologists have been happy to stick to a set of techniques that they learned in their...

Spearman Medal winner Thalia Eley on combining old and new approaches to the development of anxiety and depression.

Anxiety and depression are now recognised as major areas of public health concern, associated not only with distress to sufferers but also with serious social consequences in areas of life such as...

Mark Griffiths gives his practical recommendations based on psychological theory and research.

Although gambling is clearly of psychological interest and is a topic that The Psychologist has examined (see Orford, 2002), traditionally it has not been viewed as a public health matter (see...

Peter Spencer's Personal space

As a health psychologist, my contribution to medical history is, and is likely to remain, non-existent. However, one of my distant ancestors had the distinction of being examined by William Harvey...

Jack Rachman’s Hans Eysenck Memorial Lecture, at the 2003 Annual Conference in Bournemouth.

Ian J. Deary, winner of the Society’s 2002 Book Award, ‘looks down’ on a controversial area in this article from October 2003. 

Broadcaster Nick Ross on what psychology did for him.

I EXPECTED psychology to teach me how to look into people’s eyes and gain access to their souls. So, to tell you the truth, I was surprised to have to learn about neural pathways and bewildered at...

Articles by Howard Gardner (Higher Education in the era of globalisation), Barry Jones (Alcohol consumption on the campus), Hazel Willis, Margaret Stroebe and Miles Hewstone (Homesick blues), and Rowan Bayne (Love, money and studying: You and your personality type at university).

Our members are a diverse bunch. The one area of common ground is that you have all got a psychology degree, or you are in the process of trying to get one. Maybe your contact with higher...

Ian H. Robertson gave the Myers Lecture at
the 2003 Annual Conference – Now pay attention.

At 17.24 on 8 August 1996 the London Euston to Milton Keynes train passed through a red signal near Watford Junction and ploughed into an empty goods train, killing my colleague Ruth Holland, an...

Michael J. Apter's Personal Space

Those of us who are researchers in psychology are privileged to be working on the most interesting phenomena imaginable. But I fancy that there are times when we do not really look at them. Or...

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, winner of the 2002 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology, investigated our ‘self-monitoring’ mechanism and what happens when it fails.

My fingers pick up the pen, but I don’t control them. What they do is nothing to do with me. (Mellors, 1970, p.13)
DELUSIONS of alien control are symptoms associated with schizophrenia in...

Janet Sayers on the potential of a meeting
of psychoanalysis, neuropsychology and religion.

Like many psychologists I do not believe in God. But I am intrigued by religious and mystical experience. I am also happy to credit the healing effects of the revelatory experience of feeling...