...features

Usha Goswami gave this year’s Broadbent Lecture at the Annual Conference, suggesting that the rhyme and rhythm of different languages holds the key to dyslexia.

Why do some children learn to read well, while others of similar intellectual ability struggle to become proficient? And why is a Finnish child reading with 90 per cent accuracy by the 10th week...

Jim McCourt met Dr Louis D. Kramer and Jill Bellingham to discuss the work of the Society’s Professional Conduct Board.

FOLLOWING a distinguished career in dentistry, Dr Louis Kramer joined the Disciplinary Board (now renamed the Professional Conduct Board) as a lay member in 1993. He will finish
his second...

Patrick Davies and Zara Lipsey look at the disturbing rise
of pro-anorexia websites.

ALTHOUGH often a positive communication and information tool, the internet has its sinister side. Publicity involving internet chatrooms and paedophiles has highlighted some of the risks involved...

Vaughan Bell, Peter Halligan and Hadyn Ellis on the sometimes fine line between normality and abnormality.

Early in his third month of office, President Reagan was on his way to address a conference when John Hinckley fired six gun shots at point blank range, wounding the president and three of his...

At the Annual Conference in Bournemouth, Graham Davey gave his Presidential Address.

WHAT is clinical psychology research? Did you do a practical class in it during your undergraduate degree? The chances are that you didn’t. Is it a core content area of the curriculum? Usually not...

Adrian C. North and David J. Hargreaves on two common misconceptions.

PERHAPS, before starting to read this article, you thought ‘Is it worth my while, since it’s only about music?’ Like millions, you may like to listen to the car radio on the drive home from work,...

Miles Hewstone, winner of the 2001 Presidents’ Award, on a key social psychological strategy for reducing intergroup conflict.

It is nearly 50 years since Gordon Allport, in his classic volume The Nature of Prejudice, expounded on the ‘contact hypothesis’ for future generations of social psychologists and policy makers....

In the May issue John Donnelly spoke out in favour of the Rorschach test, but Robert Forde thinks psychologists could face legal action if they follow his advice.

JOHN Donnelly suggests that the Rorschach is ‘as valid as other personality tests’. He also ascribes the widespread criticisms of the Rorschach in the US to a ‘vocal minority’, giving the...

Stephen Joseph believes client-centred psychotherapy is a misunderstood approach with profound significance.

THE profession of psychology has traditionally had an uneasy relationship with the profession
of psychotherapy. However, times are changing and the British Psychological Society is now in...

Claire Hewson looks at the pros and cons.

Can psychological research studies conducted via the internet provide valid and reliable data? This question is becoming more and more pressing as an increasing number of psychologists take...

Linda Clare, Alan Baddeley, Esme Moniz-Cook and Bob Woods discuss advances in the understanding of dementia.

Dementia is ‘prima facie a psychological disorder’ (Morris & McKiernan, 1994), but the psychological needs of people with dementia are often ignored. Why is dementia a neglected area for...

Lucy Johnstone takes a look at a controversial therapy, still being used in the UK.

A PSYCHOLOGIST recently suggested that commenting on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was outside our arena of professional responsibility (Gelsthorpe, 1997). I disagree.
Although clinical...

What’s it like to smell pain and taste words? Jamie Ward on the unusual world of the synaesthete.

What colour is the letter A? What does the number 1 taste of? Does listening to music, speaking or eating food produce colours, shapes or textures? For most people, questions such as these will...

Rufus May, Janice Hartley and Tamasin Knight give their views on the government proposals to introduce Community Treatment Orders.

Guest editors P. Alex Linley, Stephen Joseph and Ilona Boniwell welcome you to the special issue on positive psychology.

Positive psychology was launched with Martin Seligman’s APA Presidential Address in 1998. The first American Psychologist of the new millennium (January 2000, Vol. 55) was dedicated to positive...

Dave O’Mara and Annalu Waller on using humour to help language-impaired children to communicate and participate.

Anne’s speech is difficult to understand. At the age of 10 she has already used several alternative means of communication including manual signs, a symbol chart and a voice-output communication...

David Giles interviews Martyn Barrett.

It is a quiet Friday at the University of Surrey. The campus shimmers on the hillside in summer sunshine; a few postgrads lie on the grass, perhaps contemplating England’s exit from the World Cup...

Zelda Di Blasi on the placebo effect – the ghosts that haunt the house of biomedical objectivity.

Crocodile dung, lozenges of dried vipers, blisters and bloodletting. Until this century most medications were pharmacologically inert, if not harmful. Since the age of the scientific revolution...

Katy Tapper, Pauline J. Horne and C. Fergus Lowe describe an innovative scheme to get children to eat their fruit and veg.

CHILDREN don’t like fresh fruit and vegetables. Visit any primary school canteen and you will probably see them tucking into chips, sausages, baked beans and sponge pudding. The school cook will...

Nigel Foreman (Chair, International Committee) introduces a new series of occasional articles on psychology beyond the UK. Then Klaus Helkama and Nigel Foreman look at a country with one of the highest density of psychologists in the world.

In a sense, psychology in the UK is international; the roots of the British empirical tradition are traceable to the 19th-century laboratories of Germany, and much current literature emanates from...

Michelle Brown.

AS part of my course at the University of Bath, each student has to complete a mandatory 30-week placement in the third year. Having a strong interest in memory and a grandfather who suffered from...

Roger Lamb and Mary Sissons Joshi pay tribute to social psychologist Michael Argyle, who died on 6 September.

PROFESSOR Michael Argyle was arguably the most internationally respected British social psychologist. He did more than any other individual in the UK to define the scope of social psychology, and...

At the Annual Conference in Blackpool Vicki Bruce gave her Presidential Address on getting psychological research to the people who use it.

In this article I will argue that the UK Research Assessment Exercise, while useful in some respects, is in danger
of limiting the wider dissemination and application of research findings....

...Or do too many cooks spoil the broth? Rebecca Thompson investigates collaborative memory.

The common adages ‘Two heads are better than one’, ‘Many hands make light work’ and ‘Too many cooks spoil the broth’ highlight interesting patterns of human behaviour. They suggest that the...

The winner of the 2000 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology, Richard J. Crisp, describes his research on the potential of ‘multiple social categorisation’ in reducing prejudice.

IF you think of conflicts around the world, a common link emerges: in many cases they can be traced to differences in religion, ethnicity, or countless other bases for group membership. The...