...features

...Or do too many cooks spoil the broth? Rebecca Thompson investigates collaborative memory.

The common adages ‘Two heads are better than one’, ‘Many hands make light work’ and ‘Too many cooks spoil the broth’ highlight interesting patterns of human behaviour. They suggest that the...

Meg Barker considers news depictions of children as victims and perpetrators of ‘evil’ acts.

The popular press often focuses on crimes involving children – whether as victims or perpetrators. In recent years coverage has frequently reached ‘moral panic’ proportions in the UK, with...

Sheila Payne and Rebecca Haines describe the potential contribution of psychology to palliative care.

PSYCHOLOGISTS and others have long recognised that the experience of loss, especially through the death of important people in your life, represents a challenge (Bowlby, 1980; Parkes, 1996). Even...

Susan Golombok

IN 1976 I read an article in the feminist magazine Spare Rib that was to set me off on a research path that would occupy much of my working life for the next 25 years. The picture on the front of...

Ian Rivers, winner of the Society’s Award for Promoting Equality of Opportunity 2001, considers the social inclusion of lesbians and gay men.

IN his series of exchanges with fellow author Laurence Thomas, the American philosopher Michael Levin described his opposition to the introduction of legislation that would seek to criminalise...

John Coleman

ADOLESCENCE is without doubt the Cinderella subject within developmental psychology. It gets less attention than other topics in the textbooks, in the curriculum and on the research agenda. So why...

Howard Steele discusses whether attachment theory has kept pace with the changing family.

it was a bold claim, and one now familiar to most psychologists from their undergraduate days: that immediate and long-term benefits to mental health result if an ‘infant and young child should...

Arlene Vetere and Emilia Dowling, with Rita Harris, Renos Papadopoulos, Hitesh Raval and Bernadette Wren.

In writing this action plan on the changing family in the UK, we recruited some of the members of the Tavistock Clinic family systems team to help make practical recommendations, as if giving...

Jon Cole, Harry Sumnall and Charles Grob argue that the long-term effects of Ecstasy use are far from clear, and that psychologists are muddying the waters. With peer commentaries from Michael Morgan, Rodney Croft, and Andy Parrott.

Ecstasy use and raves are a cultural phenomenon. Their impact upon the ‘Chemical Generation’ is believed by some to be the defining moment of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Picking up on this the...

W. Ray Crozier investigates the links between shyness and behavioural inhibition.

It is not difficult to conjure up an image of a shy child, tongue-tied and staring at the floor when asked a question by an adult; or hovering at the periphery of a game, perhaps peering from...

The Psychologist interviewed Pam Maras, Chair (formerly Director) of the Publications and Communications Board.

At the Annual Conference in Blackpool, Michael Billig questioned whether Freud’s analysis of jokes revealed his own repression.

‘Only joking’ – It’s one of the most common phrases in the language, frequently used when our attempts to be funny seem to be leading to problems. But can a joke be ‘just a joke’? Or is there much...

Nanette Mutrie on the relationship between exercise and psychological well-being.

The field of psychosomatic medicine has clearly established the idea that how we think and feel will affect the functioning of the body. What we do with our bodies may also affect how we think and...

Sandy Wolfson on the ethics and regulation of sport and exercise psychology.

Professional issues have featured prominently in the sport and exercise psychology literature for many years (e.g. see Nideffer, 1981). More recently a number of authors (see Andersen et al., 2000...

Jan Graydon looks beyond the yips and the jitters.

To any sportsperson the debilitative effects of high anxiety are only too familiar, and can range in severity from butterflies in the stomach to a full-blown panic attack. Over the years many...

John Kremer and David Lavallee introduce the special issue.

To many readers of The Psychologist, sport and exercise psychology must seem akin to the distant cousin that we sit beside at a family wedding – we know that she is somehow related but are not...

In the 12th annual Broadbent Lecture at the Annual Conference Dianne Berry outlined Broadbent’s explicit and implicit influences on psychological science and scientists.

In 1991 the Society launched the annual Broadbent Lecture series, with the inaugural lecture being given by Donald Broadbent himself. At the end of the lecture, which was published in The...

Jim McCourt met educational psychologists Jean Law, Elaine White and André Imich to discuss their innovative projects with schools.

School standards, pupil behaviour and pupil inclusion remain major issues for schools. To hear about creative research designed to tackle them, I met three educational psychologists in Essex –...

Ian M. Cockerill tells you how to clear the hurdles on your career path.

THE contributors to this special issue are an eclectic group.
‘Sport psychologist’ refers to a professional psychologist who works with individuals and teams in sport. But some are...

Do experts have a visual and cognitive advantage? Mark Williams reports.

Fostered by visions of favourite players and teams in action, the appeal of the study of expertise in sport is fuelled by the partisan nature of spectators and armchair fans. The scientific study...

Aidan Moran discusses mental imagery in sport: seeing, feeling and believing.

Many people believe that although sport is played with the body, it is won in the mind. Not surprisingly, sport performers increasingly turn to psychology in an effort to gain a ‘winning edge’...

Sharandeep Sanghara (undergraduate) and Laura Mitchell (postgraduate) with their winning essays on helping children with eating disorders and the pain-relieving properties of music.

Jim McCourt interviews Adrian Coyle.

Adrian Coyle is prolific. A senior lecturer at the University of Surrey with a PhD in social psychology, and joint director there of the practitioner doctorate in psychotherapy and counselling...

Sue Gardner (Ethics Committee), Pam Briggs and Camilla Herbert (Press Committee) seek your views on new challenges facing psychologists in the media.

THERE can be no doubt that in general the interaction between psychologists and the media has been beneficial to the discipline. But the celebrity article, PR company ‘surveys’, and TV programmes...

Gregory R. Maio gave his Spearman Medal Lecture at the Annual Conference in Blackpool. What happens when what you think you hold dear is questioned?

Social values, such as freedom, equality, and power, are often used as key premises for debate. For example, one individual may oppose abortion because it threatens the ‘sanctity of life’, whereas...