...features

Neil Mercer

I HAVE had a special interest in the study of language and thinking ever since I was a student. One reason back then, perhaps, was that the ‘big names’ in the field seemed particularly colourful...

Peter Bull on how our bodies can speak volumes.

BELIEF in the importance of nonverbal communication is nothing new. ‘Not to watch
a person’s mouth but his fists’ was a celebrated aphorism of Martin Luther, the 16th century Protestant...

Paul Skirrow, Christina Jones, Richard D. Griffiths and Sue Kaney (Liverpool University’s Intensive Care Research Group) describe some of the little-known psychological consequences of a stay in intensive care.

INTENSIVE care units (ICUs) are facing increasing demands, partly as a result of the gradual ‘greying’ of the population in Great Britain. As a consequence, the provision of intensive care...

Personal space - Derek Milne.

VARYING approaches to research can come into conflict under the growing pressure to collaborate across organisational boundaries and to achieve high quality standards, making it necessary for...

Guest Editor Ray Bull introduces a special issue on the contribution of forensic psychology to helping the police get the truth...and nothing but the truth.

Articles:
Elizabeth Loftus on false memories.
Gisli Gudjonsson on false confessions.
Simona Ghetti and Gail S. Goodman on how children can reject misinformation.
Aldert...

Andrew Silke with his practical recommendations for preventing further atrocities.

ICOMPILED this article back in July, several weeks before the horrific events of 11 September. So it was somewhat surprising that even in the wake of the most destructive terrorist attacks in...

At the Centenary Annual Conference Jon Sutton described the work that won him the 1999 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology.

IN February 1996, 16-year-old Katherine Morrison killed herself. Two schoolmates, Shelley McBratney and Lee Ann Murray, were put on trial for common assault. In the eyes of many, they were being...

David Pilgrim and David Hewitt discuss the practical and legal implications of the proposed ‘clinical supervisor’ role.

SOME readers of The Psychologist, or their friends or relatives, will have psychiatric treatment or admission imposed on them at some time in their lives. With their professional hat on,...

Is a bat conscious? Susan Blackmore argues that there must be something radically wrong with the way we are currently thinking about consciousness, or we would not find ourselves with seemingly intractable problems.

WHAT is it like to be a bat? This is the question asked by philosopher Thomas Nagel in his famous 1974 paper. As he explains, if there is something it is like to be the bat – something for the bat...

Is the internet a safe communication environment for socially anxious individuals, or does it in fact increase social isolation?
Robin-Marie Shepherd and Robert J. Edelmann report.

THE past decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the use of the internet; a recent estimate suggests that there are over 400 million internet users worldwide (Nua Internet Surveys, 2001) with...

Amanda Waterman, Mark Blades and Christopher Spencer ask nonsensical questions – but their research has serious implications for anyone who interviews children.

ASK one of your colleagues whether a jumper was angrier than a tree, and they might well suggest you go and have a lie down, or make yourself a nice cup of tea. But what if you asked a child?...

David Lykken and Mike Csikszentmihalyi debate the impact
of genetic factors on happiness.

David Lykken - Your average level of subjective well-being or happiness is largely determined by your genes. So if happiness is strongly genetic, that suggests that it must run in families – but...

Tommy MacKay gave his Presidential Address at April’s Centenary Conference in Glasgow.

IF you are giving a Presidential Address at the largest gathering of psychologists ever to be held in Britain, and it is to be published to the 34,000 members of the Society in addition to being a...

At the 2000 London Conference Glyn Humphreys gave his Presidents’ Award Lecture on the cognitive neuroscience of action selection.

IN everyday life we carry out many hundreds of visually guided actions on the objects that surround us. We may reach and grasp a kettle and pour boiling water from it into a teapot; we may pour...

John Archer describes a rich research agenda for evolutionary psychology in testing novel hypotheses. Peer commentaries by Robin Dunbar, Anne Campbell, Lynn Segal, David Buss, and Hilary and Steven Rose.

OVER a relatively short period of time evolutionary psychology has become a prominent way of understanding the human mind and behaviour. Its origins lie in a number of theoretical analyses of...

Christopher C. French

A FEW months ago I received an e-mail from a mature student wondering if I could explain various terrifying experiences that she had endured repeatedly for almost 20 years. On exchanging a few e-...

Jim Horne discusses the latest research on sleep, dreaming and sleep deprivation.

FOR me, one of the greatest mysteries of sleep is why so few psychologists seem to be interested in the subject. Sleep occupies so much of our time that it is arguably the commonest form of human...

Rea Reason, a winner of the 2000 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology, sets out the Society’s position on dyslexia.

THE concept of dyslexia is relevant not only to education but to several areas of psychological research and practice. In cognitive psychology it has for many years been shorthand for marked...

Jim McCourt caught up with Craig Newnes, Director of Psychological Therapies for Shropshire’s Community and Mental Health Trust, to hear an alternative perspective on research in clinical psychology.

RADICAL and forthright, Craig Newnes offers a refreshing and alternative perspective on research in clinical psychology, epitomising the notions of free thought and innovation. He is based in...

Michael J.A. Howe

WHEN a journalist recently asked me to account for my interest in geniuses, all I could think to say was ‘They are just fascinating: doesn’t everyone find geniuses interesting?’ On reflection, I...

Ed Cairns with his practical recommendations
for ending war and promoting peace.

IN today’s media-conscious world psychologists are not known for their reticence to pronounce on matters of public interest. There is one field, however, where psychologists have been unduly...

MARK GRIFFITHS on the advantages and disadvantages of providing psychological services on the internet.

A 27 - year old man comes home from a busy day at work feeling highly stressed and anxious. Unable to relax, he logs on to the internet, locates a self-help site for stress and anxiety and fills...

KATE NATION gave her Spearman Medal Lecture at the London Conference in December.

There's no doubt that learning to read is a complicated business. The first lesson children must learn is that English is an alphabetic language – letters and groups of letters map on to...

Jenny Firth-Cozens

ON the face of it there seemed to be very good reasons back in 1983 to start a study of doctors. Although a clinician, I was working at the Social and Applied Psychology Unit at the University of...

Andrew Scholey on research of the Human Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, University of Northumbria, using supply and demand in the brain to improve cognitive performance.

MOST of us accept that the capacity for exercise can be enhanced by increasing the delivery of glucose or oxygen to muscles. Could the same principles be applied to brain function? At the Human...