...features

Andy Smith

MY interest in the psychology of the common cold was triggered in 1982 over lunch with Donald Broadbent and David Tyrrell, then Director of the MRC Common Cold Unit in Salisbury.
I was...

David Rose and Nigel Foreman describe the application to psychology of a fast-developing new technology.

WHAT we now know as virtual reality (VR) had its origins in the development of ‘visually coupled’ systems (Kalawsky, 1993), which formed the basis of the first flight simulators. This is a...

Personal space - Glyn Hudson-Allez

Working as a counselling psychologist in primary care, I have noticed over the years an increasing number of middle-aged clients presenting with stress or depression or both with no specific life...

Francesca Happé gave the Spearman Medal Lecture at the Society’s London Conference in December 1998.
She argued that we can discover more about autism through examples of task success than of failure — and that it involves a distinct cognitive style, rather than deficit.

AUTISM is a devastating developmental disorder, affecting at least one in a thousand children and adults. Although biologically based, with a strong genetic component, diagnosis of autism is still...

In her 1999 Presidential Address, Ingrid Lunt
outlined her belief in the Society’s ability to draw strength from the many facets of the discipline of psychology.

THE Society has a complex structure. It has survived for almost 100 years, reacting to expansion and gaining accretions without radical change to its fundamental structure. With more than 30,000...

Richard Hammersley describes some recorded message styles.

As we all get busier, an answering machine can ensure that we only have to accept calls when we want to. I still know a few people who panic and hang up whenever they hear a recorded message, but...

Personal Space - Golda Smith

WHY are educational psychologists considered
to be able to make useful contributions that assist learning in pre-school environments, primary and secondary education but generally not in...

Guest Editor Bryan Roche introduces a special feature on modern behaviour analysis.

MODERN-day behaviour analysis is a far cry from the behaviourism popularised by John B. Watson earlier this century. Indeed, modern behaviour analysis even builds upon
and extends the...

John Sloboda gave the Presidents’ Award Lecture at the Society’s Annual Conference in Belfast, April 1999. He argued that millions of people could discover the joys of music making if we created modern equivalents of the village brass band and stopped focusing on the need
to be best.

Music presents a puzzle. On the one hand, people love music and devote much time and effort to putting themselves in the way of it. On the other hand, the levels of musical skill achieved by the...

Ruth Campbell delivered the C.S. Myers Lecture at the Society’s Annual Conference in Belfast, April 1999.

THIS article is about what is going on when we watch faces talking — how we perceive the facial actions produced in speech. Why should psychologists be interested in this? There are two reasons....

Carl Senior and Michael Smith look at how the development of the internet opens up new possibilities for psychological research.

THE internet is now in such widespread use that it is time to assess its potential and limitations as a psychological research tool. We argue that the internet is a useful tool for all areas of...

John Sheppard interviews Tom Williams, Chair of the Society’s
Professional Affairs Board.

TOM Williams took the Chair of the Professional Affairs Board (PAB) for three years from April 1999. PAB is currently one of the Boards that co-ordinate the handling of Society affairs on behalf...

Guest Editors Antony J. Chapman and Deirdre O’Reilly introduce a special issue on child development and road safety. They believe that psychology can help to cut down the UK’s alarmingly high rates of child pedestrian accidents.

Most of us, most of the time, take crossing the road for granted. As adult pedestrians, we have acquired an understanding of how accidents are caused, and have developed and can deploy abilities...

Precilla Choi

MY interest in the menstrual cycle began in 1989 when I was a research student. While I was an undergraduate, the lack of topics of specific relevance to women in the psychology curriculum had not...

Tommy MacKay argues for radical change in the principles and funding of the British educational system. This article is based on his Award for Challenging Inequality
of Opportunity Lecture given at the Society’s Annual Conference, March 1998.

‘EDUCATION and the disadvantaged: is there any justice?’ There is a sense, of course, in which that question begs the answer ‘No — there is no justice.’ That is not, however, precisely the answer...

Karen Burt and Mike Oaksford define roles for qualitative methods in developing scientific hypotheses and in fields where objective experiment is impractical.

OVER the last few years, there has been much debate in The Psychologist about the role of qualitative research in psychological science (Morgan, 1996, 1998; Stevenson & Cooper, 1997; Cooper...

In her winning entry in the undergraduate category, Kate Lothian considers the detection and treatment of depression in older people.
Alice Muir, the winner in the postgraduate category, takes a new look at stress and anxiety.

Kate Lothian - DEPRESSION has been labelled ‘the most prevalent mental health problem of elderly people’ (Mui, 1996, p.633). Indeed, depression in old age is almost twice as common as dementia (...

Ronald Francis

BEING asked why I chose to study ethics has resulted in an overdue self-interrogation. As Somerset Maugham remarked, life can only be lived forwards and understood backwards — and so it is with...

Sarah Hampson disentangles the Gordian knot of modern personality research.

PERSONALITY is impossible to define succinctly because it means different things to different personality psychologists. Whereas most would accept that the field of personality
is the study...

Amina Memon and Daniel B. Wright ask what psychological
studies can tell us about the search for the shadowy ‘John Doe 2’.

ON 19 April 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building turned to rubble as the sound of the explosion echoed through Oklahoma City. One hundred and sixty-eight people died and over 600 people...

Mark Griffiths explores the empirical reality behind the media hype.

THE report above is typical of the kind of stories that have been saturating the popular press in the UK about ‘internet addiction’. The UK edition of Newsweek reported that 2 to 3 per cent of the...

Anthony Holland demonstrates how analysis
of both genes and behaviour can illuminate research
and clinical practice in learning disability.

A MAJOR challenge in both clinical practice and research in the field of learning disability is to identify its causes: the genetic, chromosomal and environmentally determined factors that have a...

William R. Lindsay reveals how much psychologists can do to help with emotional problems even when communication is difficult.

MANY people with learning disabilities are suffering from emotional disorders, such as anxiety and depression. There are uncertainties about the level of disorder in this population, but it is...

Helen Prosser argues that the detection
and diagnosis of mental health problems in adults
with learning disabilities can be greatly improved.

THE mental health needs of adults with learning disabilities have become increasingly visible as a result of policies to move them from institutions into smaller homes based in the community....

Guest Editors Chris Hatton, Richard Hastings and Arlene Vetere introduce a special feature on learning disabilities and mental health, initiated by the North West of England Branch.

PEOPLE with learning disabilities occupy relatively little space in the consciousness of the UK psychological community (Bender, 1993; Remington, 1998). One sign of this relative neglect is the...