...features

Stephen E. G. Lea introduces the Society’s new guidelines for psychologists working with animals.

OVER 20 years ago, the Society published its first guidance on the use of animals in psychology, in the form of a working party report. That working party grew into the Society’s Standing Advisory...

Adrian Furnham looks at research on lay theories of intelligence and sex differences in estimated intelligence.

Few topics in psychology engender as much popular attention and conjecture as intelligence and intelligence testing. Academics have lost their jobs and their reputations for holding unpopular...

Chloe Smith turns the tables on Freud to give her personal analysis of his motives

THROUGHOUT his life and until the present day, Freud has been both applauded and criticised by a catalogue of scholars and numerous dinner party guests. Freud wanted fame and he has got it. The...

In the 1999 Spearman Medal Lecture Simon Killcross discussed the complex role of this influential part of the brain.

For many years the amygdala has been implicated in emotional processing. More recently its importance to our everyday psychology has been highlighted in the popular science press and in books such...

Mary Dalgleish discusses the role of occupational psychologists in the Employment Service.

‘An insightful senior manager once observed that psychologists in commercial organisations are like bidets. They add class but no one is quite sure if they are using them correctly.’ (Acker et al...

In the C.S. Myers Lecture at the Society’s Annual Conference in 2000, Stephen E.G. Lea asked ‘If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich?. 

John Raven expresses concern over the widening gap between the routinised application of ethical codes and the true seriousness of the ethical dilemmas faced by our profession.

At a recent Society meeting on the future of occupational psychology concern was expressed about a seemingly widening gap between the routinised application of ethical codes and the true...

Lynn B. Myers explores repression: what it is, how it’s done and what it might mean for psychological research and for repressors themselves.

DO you have friends or colleagues who turn up early for meetings, never seem to forget anything, are always polite and do not lose their temper? The probability is that they possess a repressive...

In her 2000 Presidential Address Pat Frankish reflected on the need for a ‘hearts and minds’ approach to change.

Thought and feeling — it seems the link between the two has been the focus of all my work as a psychologist, and of considerable interest to researchers in our premier establishments. But why did...

Derek Mitchell and James Blair argue that psychopaths lack the ‘music of emotion’.

ONE of the first things to strike you when you begin to work with psychopathic individuals is the clear discordance between the way that they verbalise emotion and the way that they appear to...

Menna Jones, the winner in the postgraduate category, argues for a psychological explanation of bipolar disorder.
Alex Linley, the winner in the undergraduate category, discusses the relationship between adversity and success.

Jones - MOST of us know the occasional experience of unpredictable moods, mood swings and changes in our own thoughts and behaviour that can happen quickly and for no apparent external reason....

Peter K. Smith

‘BRITAIN is the bullying capital of Europe’. Newspaper headlines like this appeared in late 1989, shortly after I had started research on school bullying and reported findings on its extent. The...

Mark H. Johnson looks at babies’ cognitive and brain development and describes how they actively contribute to the construction of their own brain.

IS it a valuable investment in the future to provide ‘enriched’ environments for young infants, as suggested at a meeting in 1997 convened by Bill and Hillary Clinton? Is it worthwhile attempting...

I USED to be a worried social psychologist, fretting that I wasn’t where the action was. I’d collect people’s views on unemployment or their opinions about their friends. I’d get them to fill in...

Judy Dunn reveals the illuminating perspectives
offered by the study of what are, for most people,
their longest-lasting relationships.

Most of us grow up with brothers and sisters — the figure is around 80 per cent for people in the UK and the US. And our relationships with our siblings are the longest-lasting we’ll probably have...

Barrie Gunter argues that TV ratings systems
may be based on an incomplete understanding of audience psychology.

The rapid growth of television channels following the launch of cable, satellite and digital transmission systems has created a fresh challenge for viewers. How, given a much expanded programme...

John Sheppard interviews Tony Gale, who this month finishes as the Society’s Honorary General Secretary, on his time in office and his view of recent changes in the Society’s structure and functioning.

‘The Honorary General Secretary’s position is exceptionally powerful and there is a need to trim it.’ This forthright statement comes not from one who opposes the present incumbent, nor even from...

Stephen Newstead gives a psychological perspective on recent developments in higher education. This article is an abridged version of his Award for Distinguished Contributions to
the Teaching of Psychology lecture at the Society’s London Conference, December 1999.

British higher education has undergone major changes in recent years. These changes include: the modularisation and semesterisation of courses; increased participation rate; changes in the profile...

David Messer looks at the continuing controversies.

Many would argue that using language is an ability unique to humans. It is a central component to all our lives and is especially important in allowing children to learn so much and so extensively...

John Sheppard interviews Colin Newman, who is retiring after two decades as the Society’s Executive Secretary.

COLIN Newman is the Society; the Society is Colin Newman. This is how many, both within and outside the Society, see things. The Society’s Executive Secretary for the best part of 20 years, his...

Margaret A. Boden explores how computers can help us understand human creativity.

You may already be foaming at the mouth. Merely reading the title may have infuriated you: ‘What nonsense,’ you may be thinking, ‘Computers can’t really be creative!’Well, maybe they can’t. But...

Philip Banyard and Nigel Hunt analyse what is missing from the method sections of British psychology journals.

ARE we telling the full story in our research reports? Do the journals of the British Psychological Society give full accounts of procedure in their method sections? And is our research still...

Guest Editor Graham Beaumont introduces a special issue on clinical neuropsychology.

Neuropsychology is the scientific study of the relationship between the brain and mental life; clinical neuropsychology, of those aspects concerning the psychological assessment, management and...

The new millennium does not, strictly speaking, begin until 1 January 2001. But it’s clear that in the public’s view the change in the calendar from 1999 to 2000 is the big psychological event.
So here we present some thoughts from various perspectives on why many people see the year 2000 as so significant …

Barbara A. Wilson

What is it about the study of brain injury that grabbed my interest in my student days and continues to intrigue me? I know that the division between normality and abnormality, and the frail...