...looks back

Stanley Milgram’s widow, Alexandra Milgram, with her personal take on his life

Stephen D. Reicher and S. Alexander Haslam introduce a special feature which reconnects with Milgram’s vision for social psychology

Stanley Milgram had an epic vision for social psychology: to create strong experimental contexts that would demonstrate the power of the social world to shape individual behaviour. Consistent with...

Jim Horne with what must surely be the goriest article in the history of The Psychologist

Tamsin Williams looks at Benoît Mandelbrot and the creation of fractal geometry

Ronald Melzack, an author of the hugely influential gate control theory of pain, on an important paradigm shift over the last half-century

Hall P. Beck, with Gary Irons, reports on a seven-year search for psychology’s lost boy

Roderick D. Buchanan on ‘probably the most divisive figure British psychology has ever produced’.

Anna Greenwood on a relatively short-lived colonial affliction

why studying our past is going global, with Adrian Brock

James T. Lamiell on a century-old text containing a ‘cornucopia of ideas that remain in the forefront of developmental psychology’

Graham Richards looks at nine methodological lessons of a highly successful failure

How better to introduce students to the problems of psychological research than to consider the 1898 Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to the Torres Straits between Australia and Papua New...

Peter Lamont on how early psychologists turned to the grand wizards in an effort to transform illusions into a reality

Psychologists are supposed to be experts on how people think and behave. Yet magicians have always displayed a more wonderful ability to direct thoughts and actions. Thus, every now and again, for...

David K. Robinson on an important meeting of minds at Leipzig University

In terms of personalities and psychological method, Gustav Theodor Fechner (1801–1887) occupies a critical position in the history of psychology, between the pioneering sensory physiologist, Ernst...

Elizabeth Valentine profiles three women at the forefront of the development of the discipline

What role did women play in the early days of psychology in Britain? Did they conform to the female stereotype of ‘caring’ practitioners rather than to the male stereotype of unemotional...

Daniel N. Robinson on the 150th anniversary of a text that many consider to be the first in experimental psychology

Fechner’s attempt to place psychology on the firm foundations of experimental science was undertaken in a sceptical intellectual atmosphere still philosophically dominated by post-Kantian thought...

Geoff Bunn introduces a special issue marking the 150th Anniversary of Gustav Fechner’s Elements of Psychophysics

Considered by some psychologists to be the ‘founding father’ of experimental psychology, Gustav Fechner (1801–1887) was, to some extent, an uncompromisingly hard-nosed materialist. Yet there was...

Alan Costall engages in some presentist futurology

Extracts from a recording of Frederic Charles Bartlett speaking made in 1959 by John C. Kenna, the Society’s first Honorary Archivist

Philip Barnard with some experimental highlights from the influential Applied Psychology Research Unit

Empirical research conducted in the laboratory, in the clinic or in the field naturally forms the foundations on which our practical applications of psychology are built. Yet as theoretical...

Ludy T. Benjamin Jr on a fascinating trial and a psychologist’s role in it

Mark M. Smith on when ‘looking’ back makes less sense

Can we really understand how people in the past perceived their world in sensory terms? Can we ever reach an understanding of what, say, 18th-century Australia sounded like? What smells meant to...

Nestar Russell explores the early evolution of Stanley Milgram’s first official obedience to authority experiment

Ron Roberts on the continuing relevance of Thomas Szasz, now in his 90th year

Arthur I. Miller on a meeting of minds between Carl Jung and the physicist Wolfgang Pauli

Hazel Stevenson on Sylvia Downs’ lifetime of achievement in occupational psychology

In November 2009 Sylvia Downs received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Division of Occupational Psychology, recognising her outstanding contribution to our profession. As this 83-year-old...