...looks back

Richard S. Hallam and Michael P. Bender recount a tragic tale

Chris Goodey on how the archaic concepts of ‘honour’ and ‘grace’ may be the very foundations of psychological inquiry

Trevor Butt finds an interesting recurring theme in the later work of the famous personality theorist

Oliver Robinson on the history of the idiographic/nomothetic debate

Jörgen L. Pind examines Edgar Rubin’s dissertation on the figure–ground distinction, one of the great classics of perceptual psychology

Sandy Lovie and Pat Lovie on the life and influence of Charles Edward Spearman

Robert S. Gable on how he and his brother invented electronic monitoring, but with an early emphasis on positive reinforcement

Alison Torn investigates the strange case of Margery Kempe

Richard Overy, Professor of History at the University of Exeter, in conversation with Stephen Reicher and Alex Haslam

Film scholar Kathryn Millard looks at Stanley Milgram as filmmaker. For Kathryn's new film on the subject, see http://shockroomfilm.com

Jerry M. Burger updates the enduring legacy of the Milgram Obedience Studies

Stanley Milgram’s widow, Alexandra Milgram, with her personal take on his life

Stephen D. Reicher and S. Alexander Haslam introduce a special feature which reconnects with Milgram’s vision for social psychology

Stanley Milgram had an epic vision for social psychology: to create strong experimental contexts that would demonstrate the power of the social world to shape individual behaviour. Consistent with...

Jim Horne with what must surely be the goriest article in the history of The Psychologist

Tamsin Williams looks at Benoît Mandelbrot and the creation of fractal geometry

Ronald Melzack, an author of the hugely influential gate control theory of pain, on an important paradigm shift over the last half-century

Hall P. Beck, with Gary Irons, reports on a seven-year search for psychology’s lost boy

Roderick D. Buchanan on ‘probably the most divisive figure British psychology has ever produced’.

Anna Greenwood on a relatively short-lived colonial affliction

why studying our past is going global, with Adrian Brock

James T. Lamiell on a century-old text containing a ‘cornucopia of ideas that remain in the forefront of developmental psychology’

Geoff Bunn introduces a special issue marking the 150th Anniversary of Gustav Fechner’s Elements of Psychophysics

Considered by some psychologists to be the ‘founding father’ of experimental psychology, Gustav Fechner (1801–1887) was, to some extent, an uncompromisingly hard-nosed materialist. Yet there was...

Alan Costall engages in some presentist futurology

Extracts from a recording of Frederic Charles Bartlett speaking made in 1959 by John C. Kenna, the Society’s first Honorary Archivist

Philip Barnard with some experimental highlights from the influential Applied Psychology Research Unit

Empirical research conducted in the laboratory, in the clinic or in the field naturally forms the foundations on which our practical applications of psychology are built. Yet as theoretical...