...looks back

Ali Teymoori and Rose Trappes consider Immanuel Kant’s influence on psychology.

The German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) has played an undeniably crucial role in the development of psychology as a discipline, much of which has escaped the attention of modern...

Helen E. Ross (Honorary Professor, University of Stirling) recalls an ‘out of this world’ research experience.
Natalie Bigbie and Nils Muhlert on the life and work of Tom Hatherley Pear.
Andrew P. Wickens (a winner of the British Psychological Society’s Book Award) considers their historical significance.

The history of neuroscience is rarely taught in universities, and few books trace developments from the ancient past to the present. Here, I present five of my favourite illustrations from my...

Huw Green with a historical take on agency in madness.
Marjory Harper delves into archives for tales of alien environments and unfulfilled expectations.
Scholars are finding that medieval science – in various fields – is more sophisticated than previously thought. Corinne Saunders and Charles Fernyhough show that psychology is no exception.
David Pilgrim considers vitalism and other explanations of what it is to be human.
Joanna Bourke looks into physical and emotional wounding after the First World War.
Derek Collett looks at the life and psychological novels of Nigel Balchin.
Dorothy Bishop celebrates the career of one of her academic heroes, Reuben Conrad, as he reaches 100.
Edgar Jones explores how British people responded to air raids during the Second World War, and what this tells us about coping under extreme stress.
Sandie McHugh and Jerome Carson describe two happiness surveys from Bolton, 76 years apart.
Novelist Alex Pheby on why Daniel Paul Schreber's Memoirs are important and useful.
Joanna Moncrieff examines the socio-economic history of psychoactive drug use.
Philip J. Corr on the life and work of Hans J. Eysenck.
John Launer challenges the image of Sabina Spielrein principally as Carl Jung’s mistress: was she one of the most innovative thinkers in 20th-century psychology?
Alice Violett turns to late 19th- and early 20th-century psychologists for the origins of stereotypes around only children.
Gail A. Hornstein considers artistic depictions of insanity.
Ben Shephard considers our discipline’s involvement, on all sides.
Albert A. Harrison looks for lessons from history.
For centuries, a little Belgian town has treated the mentally ill. Why are its medieval methods so successful? Mike Jay investigates.
Anna Madill outlines how qualitative methods in psychology, and the Society’s Section, have blossomed over the years.
Stephanie M. Cobb imagines three perspectives on transference and countertransference.
Alexandra Rutherford, Kelli Vaughn-Johnson and Elissa Rodkey.