...reviews

Rebecca Hill on A Time to Live
Dr Sally Marlow is not impressed by 'Obsession' at the Barbican.
Rachelle Dawson (a Graduate Research Assistant) reviews Calm Harm and Self-Heal.
Victoria Tinker (an Assistant Psychologist with Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust) on the BBC's Mind Over Marathon.
A review of Certain Women, a new film directed by Kelly Reichardt.
A new documentary on mental health and the LGBT+ community, from King's College London.
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time. Theatre Royal, Nottingham (Director: Marianne Elliott); reviewed by Stacey A. Bedwell.
Pamela Jacobsen emerges well rested from sleeping with the fishes: experiencing Max Richter's 'Sleep' at Old Billingsgate, London.
Kawthar Alli visits 'Hearing Voices: Suffering, Inspiration and the Everyday', an exhibition at Palace Green Library, Durham.
Lucy Johnstone reviews BBC Horizon's 'Why did I go mad?'
Simon Goodman reviews an unusual dramatic take on the 'refugee crisis'.
Dr Sally Marlow listens to the 'Who Cares? What's the Point?' podcast from psychologist Dr Sarb Johal.
Two reactions to the Netflix series '13 Reasons Why'; firstly from Madeleine Pownall, and then Eirian Kerry.
Kate Johnstone reviews S-Town.
Rabeea Saleem reviews Admissions, the new memoir from neurosurgeon Henry Marsh.
Dr Sally Marlow on the duo's latest album.
Niall James Holohan reviews a BBC Radio 3 documentary featuring Dr Sally Marlow.
Victoria Tischler reviews 'This Way Madness Lies', by Mike Jay.
Our editor Jon Sutton reviews The Art of Losing Control: A Philosopher’s Search for Ecstatic Experience, by Jules Evans; and read the introductory chapter.
Emily Hutchinson reviews 'The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed the World'.
Rachel Williams on a never-ending performance of gender and identity.
Dr Lynsey Gozna (University of Leicester) watches Channel 4's 'A Killing in My Family', featuring the work of bereavement charity Winston's Wish.
Editor Jon Sutton and Philip Corr on an unusual musical project from 'Russian Linesman', drawing on Hans Eysenck and personality theory.
Dr Lydia J. Harkin reviews 'Psychology of the Digital Age: Humans Become Electric', by John R. Suler.
Rabeea Saleem, writer and psychology student based in Pakistan, reviews 'Hit Makers: How Things Become Popular', by Derek Thompson.