brain injury

Could you survive a small crowbar passing completely through your head? Most psychologists would answer ‘Yes’: almost all of them learned that Phineas Gage did. Although Phineas’ accident occurred 160 years ago this month, its consequences are still discussed in most...

The limits of consciousness are hard to define satisfactorily and quantitatively, and we can only infer the self-awareness of others by their appearance and by their acts.’ (Plum & Posner, 1983, The Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma, p.3)Martha is a young woman. Not...

Much has been written in The Psychologist (eg. Macmillan, 2008) and elsewhere about Phineas Gage. Many of us know how, as a result of a railroad accident in 1848, Gage lost part of the frontal area of his brain, and lived a different but...

The way of paradoxes is the way of truth.
Oscar Wilde, 1891

‘Thus, the feeling I sometimes have – which all of us who work closely with aphasics have – that one cannot lie to an aphasic… it was the grimaces, the histrionisms, the false gestures and...