personality

'Individual differences’ seems an innocuous term, but the normalising of differential psychology is relatively recent in Britain. The brilliant but controversial figure of Hans Eysenck sparked polarising debates over questions such as the heritability of intelligence, the...

Individual differences research can justifiably claim to have played a central role in the history of British psychology, as Matthews and Petrides illustrate in their introduction to this special issue. Especially in Britain, this area of personality has been dominated by the...

There is a long tradition in British psychology and psychiatry of viewing mental illnesses as the extreme ends of normal personality continua. If we define personality as long-term stability in cognition, emotion and behaviour, then we can view such illnesses as expressions...

Intelligence is arguably psychology’s best-attested and most important variable. Britain has made notable contributions to intelligence since the late 19th century (Deary, 2001), and researchers continue to apply the principles and theories in areas of vital importance to...

Personality psychology in Britain is making contributions to understanding a fundamental question: What factors drive prosocial and antisocial behaviours? This work has identified a number of insights into altruism and cooperation, gratitude and aggression, specifically how...