replication

Introducing a symposium on innovations in open science, following on from Brian Nosek’s opening keynote, Mark Andrews reminded us that openness has always been one of the defining values of...

One of the founding fathers of the replication crisis-turned-reformation, Professor Brian Nosek, opened the 2018 British Psychological Society Annual Conference with a startling picture of how our science has changed in a few short years. Co-founder and Director of the...

With hints at hope and progress, but still with a healthy dose of scepticism, the British Psychological Society, Experimental Psychology Society and Association of Heads of Psychology Departments, in association with Wiley, hosted a second event at the Royal Society to...

The clamour around the ‘tone’ of the debate around replication and reproducibility in psychological science grew again in January, following the publication of a Boston Globe piece by Pardis Sabeti titled ‘...

The British Psychological Society (BPS) and John Wiley & Sons Journal of Neuropsychology is now accepting publication of Registered Reports. These allow authors to register their planned experiment, methodology and suggested statistical tests, prior to data collection....

Psychological science may just be in the midst of a renaissance. After waves of revelations about the apparent inaccuracy of research, questionable statistical practices and the lack of successful replications of psychology studies, are there signs that the tide has turned?...

Our editor Jon Sutton met Marcus Munafò at the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society's Psychobiology Section, where he was an invited speaker. Winner of the British...

Academic research can be a tough, messy business. Add in the wonderful complexity of the people that are usually the subject matter of psychology and it's little wonder that a career can be a path of wrong turnings, forking paths and dead ends. The 'replication crisis' of...

For the past few years, the discipline of psychology has been undergoing a period of methodological self-criticism and debate that we usually refer to as the ‘replication crisis’. It began in 2011 and went up a gear in 2015 with the publication of the results of the...

In August 2005 a paper by John Ioannidis, ‘Why most published research findings are false’, ignited a new debate across psychology and the biomedical sciences about the reliability and robustness of many published journal articles. This reproducibility ‘crisis’, while at...