war

Opening 100 years after the beginning of the Battle of the Somme, when 57,000 soldiers were killed on the first day, the Science Museum is mounting a fascinating exhibition entitled ‘Wounded: Conflict, Casualties and Care’.

...

The declaration of war in September 1939 exposed civilians in Britain not only to the prospect of an invasion but also to the threat of chemical weapons. Planners believed that Germany would conduct an intense aerial campaign, dropping not only incendiaries but also bombs...

I found just over half the featured articles on ‘Can psychology find a path to peace’ (February 2016) alternately perplexing and frustrating.

In Masi Noor’s piece, what actually does ‘...

I write following the challenge in the February issue: Can psychology find a path to peace?

Of course, we all want peaceful outcomes to the present turmoil within various individual...

The attacks in Paris, Beirut and more. The vote to begin UK bombing in Syria. Events of huge, worldwide significance. They demand a response, and our discipline of psychology should be well placed to provide one.

But what? In the acres of coverage today and in recent...

Idris Elba was at the forefront of the trend for black British actors to turn to the States for roles of substance. He gave a stellar performance as Stringer Bell in The Wire, itself a trail-blazer for the now familiar long-form of TV drama. It is therefore fitting that Elba...

A psychologist will launch a new programme of joint research projects with the aim of creating interventions to help children whose mental health has been ravaged by the effects of war. The devastating trauma that can affect young minds has been the subject of extensive...

The British psychologist Philip Vernon once described the 1900s as ‘the most exciting decade in psychology since the death of Aristotle’. That being the case, you might have expected the war that broke out in 1914 to be a very psychological one.

In Britain it was not....

I am in two minds about the new film version of Macbeth, directed by Justin Kurzel. Did I like it? I certainly enjoyed it, if that is the right term for spending 90 minutes watching scenes of battle and murder, with no shortage...

Professor Edgar Jones (Kings College London), a historian of psychology and psychiatry, opened this fascinating talk with an iconic wartime picture of St Paul’s Cathedral standing unharmed amidst the burning City of London. Yet the photograph is actually a composite of three...