Edition 11

Including the BPS response to RAE consultation, and Arthur Summerfield (1923-2005).

Heather Jackson asks 'Sitting comfortably? Then let's talk!'

Including 'Sight unseen' reviewed by Richard Gregory.

Peter K. Smith on an important and suprisingly underresrearched relationship.

While a great deal is written about parents, relatively little is written about grandparents, and their relationships with grandchildren. Yet some three-quarters of adults will become grandparents...

Lynn Myers and Charles Abraham on helping patients to act on healthcare professionals’ advice.

DOCTORS and nurses spend much of their working time discussing and assessing patients’ healthcare problems and recommending actions which will help restore or maintain health. On the basis of...

Charles Abraham and Susan Michie on their work with the government’s Division of Public Health.

In the last few years non-medical specialisms have been recognised within UK public health and, at the same time, UK health psychology has developed a clearer public health focus.
In 2003...

Jane Wardle and Andrew Steptoe discuss how to take health psychology to the next level.

Health psychology had its origins in clinical psychology, social psychology and psychophysiology. Its traditional focus was on functioning at the level of the individual and understanding...

Guest editors Charles Abraham and Susan Michie introduce the special issue.

A healthy nation needs well-trained GPs and good hospitals delivering high-quality treatments. But prevention is better than cure, and these days preventive health behaviour is a government mantra...

Dave Bartram, winner of the Society’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology, on the role for psychologists in a new web-based era.

Psychological testing probably touches more people more often than any other application of psychology. We are tested from cradle to grave; as we progress through the educational system; when we...

Including the dyslexia debate, developments in neuroscience, bi-invisibility, bad psychology, and teaching qualitative methods.