September 2017

For psychology students, the start of the new term brings reading lists containing a wealth of essential, core and recommended reading. While lecturers recommend textbooks and books to support your course or specific modules, we know that many students read a variety of books that stimulate their personal interest and provide them with extra insights into psychology.
The Psychologist’s Companion for Undergraduates by Robert Sternberg & Karin Sternberg (Cambridge University Press; Pb £27.99).
Early Childhood and Neuroscience: Theory, Research and Implications for Practice Mine Conkbayir Bloomsbury Academic; Pb £17.99
Professor of Social and Organisational Psychology, University of Exeter; and Professor of Diversity, University of Groningen.
Two books on 'boarding school survivors' reviewed.
Helen Cassaday poses an ethical dilemma, provides her view and seeks responses.
Clai Rice and Brandon Barker consider what some classic tricks tell us about perception and our understanding of reality.

We have spent the past seven years studying an overlooked kind of children’s folklore: a genre of play in which youngsters perform traditionalised kinaesthetic and verbal actions in order to...

Dinsa Sachan considers the evidence on how foreign living shapes us.

Recent research shows that people who live abroad are often more creative and successful in their careers. But there’s also one big downside associated with foreign experiences. 

Although she has conducted research in several areas, Christina Maslach is best known for her pioneering work on ‘burnout’. It’s a concept with great academic and popular appeal as it captures a common experience among employees, especially those working within the helping professions. Gail Kinman and Kevin Teoh interviewed Professor Maslach at the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology conference in Athens, where she was a keynote speaker.