...features

The Midlands Psychology Group questions whether Lord Layard’s focus is all wrong. Perhaps unhappiness is one of our most precious assets?

Recent times have seen the science and politics of ‘happiness’ endorsed by commentators of all persuasions, including the Conservatives and New Labour, who have welcomed the proposals of Richard...

Jack Nissan, winner in the undergraduate category of our Student Writer Competition, on surprising findings surrounding the memory of people with Alzheimer’s.
Samuel R. Nyman, winner in the postgraduate category, on ways of preventing falls in older people without creating a stigma.

Judges’ report
This was the ninth annual Student Writer Competition, sponsored by The Psychologist, the Research Board and the Professional Practice Board. The number of entries was...

Former American Psychological Association President Ronald F. Levant on how he has mobilised members to promote the contributions of psychology to society
Also Graham Davey, former Society President and Chair of the Publications and Communications Board, responds to Ronald Levant

Making Psychology a Household Word was an overarching theme of my 2005 presidency of the American Psychological Association. As members of a learned profession, we have a great deal to offer...

Nigel Hunt and Sue McHale on the limited research and the need for more

Hair loss is usually thought of as something men start worrying about as they get older. But there are various forms of hair loss, often extensive and sudden, which can impact on anyone – male or...

Peter Halligan, winner of the Society's Presidents' Award, on the importance of societal and individual beliefs in understanding health

Despite improvements in many objective measures of health over the past decades, most Western countries have seen an increase in the number of patients with symptom-based illness without...

Rufus May on rethinking 'sanity', within a community psychology approach

Working outside the diagnostic frame
We cannot abandon the injured or the maimed, thinking to ensure our own safety and sanity. We must reclaim them, as they are part of ourselves.
...

Peter Campbell with a service-user's perspective on the impact of diagnosis

Psychiatric understandings dominate our view of mental illness. This has not always been so. It was not until the mid-nineteenth century that psychiatrists wrested control of asylums away from lay...

Mary Boyle on why we are still diagnosing, and the pitfalls. Also Richard P. Bentall shows that if you get to the bottom of the symptoms, there is no 'disorder' left to explain

The problem with diagnosis
Psychiatric diagnosis is fundamental to psychology not practising what it preaches. The idea that diagnosis identifies mental disorders which may become objects of...

John Cromby, Dave Harper and Paula Reavey introduce the special issue

Moving beyond diagnosis:
Practising what we preach
Despite years of well-founded criticism, psychiatric diagnosis is still widely used – not only by psychiatrists, but psychologists...

Susan Cartwright and Cary L. Cooper on causes and possible solutions

Despite the potential pressures of long hours, tight deadlines and performance targets, many aspire to the status and rewards of a job in the City of London. But perhaps few job applicants would...

David Lynch’s latest film, Inland Empire, takes us closer to the heart of his psychotic universe. Huw Green enjoys the journey.

The word ‘surrealist’ is frequently applied to the work of maverick American film director David Lynch (Bradshaw & Gilchrist, 2007). This automatically links his name with the art movement...

Dave Harper, John Cromby, Paula Reavey, Anne Cooke and Jill Anderson with some pointers

Don’t jump ship!
New approaches in teaching mental health to undergraduates
We hope that the articles in this special issue have convinced you of the need to move beyond diagnosis....

Keith Oatley describes how even in an age of genomics, neuroimaging and Prozac, our understanding of emotional disorders continues to involve the ups and downs of everyday experience

Slings and arrows
Depression and life events
Keith Oatley describes how even in an age of genomics, neuroimaging and Prozac, our understanding of emotional disorders continues to...

Carolyn Kagan on community practice

Working at the ‘edge’
Making use of psychological resources through collaboration
Carolyn Kagan, winner of the Society’s Award for Promoting Equality of Opportunity, on community...

Dinka Corkalo Biruski, Ivan Jerkovic, Marija Zotovic and Igor Krnectic with the lastest in our international series.

Psychology in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
Dinka Corkalo Biruski, Ivan Jerkovic, Marija Zotovic and Igor Krnetic with the latest in our international series.
The first...

Liz Pellicano with an important perspective on a devastating condition.

Valerie Yule argues for drastic action in the fight against reading problems

Valerie Yule argues for drastic action in the fight against reading problems.
As psychologists, we research the nature of literacy and literacy skills. We assess and address defects in...

At the Society's Annual Conference in York, outgoing President Ray Miller delivered his address: 'Fit for the future?'

Mala German and Kimberly Ehntholt on projects within schools and the community

Working with refugee children and families
There is much that psychologists from all disciplines can offer when working with refugee/asylum-seeking children and families (see Ehntholt &...

Rachel Tribe and Nimisha Patel introduce the special issue

Refugees and asylum seekers
Robert was forced to flee from East Africa, where he worked as a teacher, after he was accused of belonging to a proscribed political group. He was taken into...

Nimisha Patel and Aruna Mahtani urge you to reconsider your research and practice

The politics of working with refugee survivors of torture
The plight of refugee people often results from structural inequalities and gross human rights violations, including genocide,...

Melinda Rees, Pennie Blackburn, Damon Lab and Jane Herlihy offer some advice

Working with asylum seekers in a clinical setting
To many mental health professionals, working with asylum seekers may appear to be a specialist area that requires particular expertise....

Rachel Tribe with issues for consideration, and some guidelines

Working with interpreters
You have been allocated a referral – Dr A, an asylum seeker from Ethiopia – and are due to see her at 11am tomorrow. You are told that an interpreter has been...

Adrian Webster and Mary Robertson look beyond the individual approach

Can community psychology meet the needs of refugees?
While there are many diverse approaches to mental health, services in England are predominantly organised around an individualised,...

Sandi Mann on why boredom at work is no longer restricted to 'boring' jobs

The Boredom Boom
Be it at a desk at the Treasury Department, a spot on the factory floor, or a drab blue cubicle, boredom is a condition that can be more stressful and damaging than overwork...