...features

Paul Wicks on the potential problem, and an innovative solution

Where do you get your control participants from? Posters? Newspaper ads? Anyone who’s carried out research with human volunteers knows they can be hard to reach, and that meagre research funding...

Alex Wood, Stephen Joseph and Alex Linley on current research and future directions.

Gratitude is not only the greatest of the virtues, but the parent of all of the others – Cicero (106–43bc) A noble person is mindful and thankful of the favours he receives from others – The...

Josephine Ross with some fascinating anecdotal accounts of creative and scientific insights in dreams

SPENT the night naked in a public place again? Late for an important appointment? Picking your teeth up off the floor? You may not see the need for this nightly torture, but the typical person...

Martin J. Pickering gave the Broadbent Lecture at the Society's Annual Conference, on the remarkable and unconscious ways that people align in conversations

How should experimental psychologists study language? In courses, textbooks, and journals, it is treated alongside other topics such as attention, perception, memory, and reasoning, and it tends...

Vitaliy Panok, Valentyna Pavlenko and Liliya Korallo with the lastest in our international series

Ukraine has just undergone its ‘orange revolution’, bringing to power a president (Yushenko) who declared his intent to rid the country of corruption and the trappings of old-style communism –...

Gill Aitken, winner of the Society's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology, with a personal account

‘If there was a service in the community’; ‘if we had the staff who could work with self-injury’; ‘our service is for mental illness not personality disorder’. All too familiar accounts, heard in...

Khadj Rouf with a personal perspective on changes and how they are affecting psychologists and the public.

No-one can have escaped the furore that there has been over the National Health Service in recent months. There has been much in the national press lately about the current state of the National...

Sheila Keegan on what we can learn from the world of commercial qualitative research.

Qualitative research is widespread within the private and public sectors. It informs most commercial marketing campaigns, public service communications and much organisational change. So why is...

Eirini Flouri looks at parental aspirations and educational outcomes in socio-economically disadvantaged children.

MANY of you – maybe all of you – have ‘aspirations’, defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as ‘strong hope or wish for achievement or success’. Usually operationalised in the social sciences as...

Mel Goodale and David Milner, winners of the Society’s Book Award, outline their research.

Why would anyone think we have two visual systems? After all, we have only one pair of eyes – and clearly we have only one indivisible visual experience of the world. Surely it would be more...

By John Hall and Sue Llewelyn.

PSYCHOLOGY is one of the most popular degree subjects in Britain, while clinical psychology is the most popular psychology-related career choice for psychology graduates. So most psychology...

Patrick Rabbitt on a long and winding road of research.

My excuses for starting what eventually turned out to be a
22-year longitudinal study of cognitive changes in old age are that I had no idea that it could possibly last that long, and it...

By Jeremy Miles.

I am as interested in people as pretty much every other psychologist. I chose to study psychology, rather than any other science, because it was about something that was big and real and tangible...

Sonia Livingstone’s Argyle Lecture from the Society’s Annual Conference, on rules and roles in the media-rich home.

Is the internet bringing more opportunities to children and young people? Are children encountering new risks online? How are parents responding? Indeed, whose responsibility is children’s online...

David Dunning with some fascinating studies into how and why we are deluded about the self.

Ninety per cent of the world’s woe comes from people not knowing themselves, their abilities, their frailties, and even their real virtues. Most of us go almost all the way through life as...

Ninna Makrinov, Judith Scharager and Rogelio Diaz with the latest in our international series.

Chile is a sparsely populated country in South America, at the ‘end of the world’. Despite having an area of around three times the UK, its population is only just over 15 million. It
is...

Christian Jarrett on psychology’s place in new architectural development.

THE space around us affects us profoundly – emotionally, behaviourally, cognitively. In Britain that space is changing at a pace not seen for a generation – over one million homes to be built by...

Peter Farrell, Kevin Woods, Sarah Lewis,
Steve Rooney, Garry Squires and Mike O'Connor discuss the implications of a government-funded review of the work of educational psychologists

The Government’s ‘Every Child Matters’ (ECM) legislation constitutes a major national strategic initiative in the improvement of services provided to children and families (DfES, 2004). The ECM...

Laura Golding and Ian Gray look at the what, why and how.

From October, chartered members of the British Psychological Society face the possibility of having their practising certificates withheld if they do not produce the appropriate evidence of...

Freud understood that remembering is motivated by goals and nonconscious processes. Martin A. Conway reflects on his ideas.

Memories are curious things. Sometimes they masquerade as thoughts, feelings, or images, without revealing themselves as memories. Sometimes they come to mind and seem relatively meaningless,...

Mick Power on theoretical and practical influences.

Freud, and the general domain of psychoanalytic thought, have always been controversial. In our lifetime, much of the attack on psychoanalysis has come from within psychology; in particular, on...

Wendy Hollway on how Freud has influenced her thinking on theory and method.

I’m increasingly impressed with how radical a thinker Freud was, now that I appreciate what it takes to excavate anxiety-provoking experience for the purposes of understanding. Freud identified...

Stephen Frosh on the tension between order and disorder in his and Freud’s careers.

It’s funny to reflect on how I became attached to the ‘idea’ of Freud. These days I’m engrossed in questions of identity and otherness, in both psychosocial and psychoanalytic terms. This has led...

Michael Billig with his personal reflections.

During the 1950s and early 1960s the image of the psychologist in popular culture was that of a psychoanalyst – usually male, bearded and speaking with a heavy accent. When I went off to study...

Mark Solms on a perhaps unlikely alliance.

I trained in neuropsychology in the early 1980s. At that time (even more than today) the field was dominated by cognitive theory and methods. We learned a great deal about the manner in which the...