...features

Sophia E. Shaw, Ellen Nye, Joanna Jamel & Heather D. Flowe ask whether the media function as disseminators of knowledge or misinformation?

Psychologists often find their research reported in the popular press. In this article, a recent case is discussed in which the media misrepresented the findings from a study that examined factors...

Paul McCarthy offers some reflections on supervising writing in a PhD

'If I’d had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.'
This well-known witticism, apparently uttered by Blaise Pascal, Mark Twain, Victor Meldrew and many others, reflects...

Steven Killick and Neil Frude talk about the psychology of oral storytelling in this 2009 article.

Chris Frith, winner of the Society’s 2008 Book Award with Making Up the Mind, on how his ideas have developed, and the surprising implications

My book Making Up the Mind is partly a scientific autobiography, describing a career that seems to have taken a satisfyingly circular course. This has progressed from an interest in the newest...

Christian Jarrett enters the strange and controversial world of the ‘default mode network’

Functional brain imaging promised to lift the lid on the black box. Psychologists responded in earnest, prodding the brain and watching which areas light up and which stay dark. But what if the...

Luke Jefferies looks at an approach to communication and social interaction that could be coming of age; and Cathy Harding and Ruth Berry look at the case-study evidence

Intensive interaction (II) is an exciting person-centred approach to social interaction traditionally used with people with profound learning disabilities or autism. It is relatively...

Benjamin Gardner looks at a method for recruiting to internet-based research studies; and Rory Allen and Ian Hannent on a new computerised tool

The submission deadline approaches, and students send out desperate e-mails requesting participants. ‘Please, please help me! 20 participants needed by Friday!’ Many of these requests seem to...

Julian Boon and Lynsey Gozna rail against the futility of much psychological research, with particular reference to the ‘chameleon offender’

Jacob B. Hirsh looks at performance prediction, an area with some of the strongest relationships in psychological research

Good help is hard to find – at least when you’re using the wrong tools. Although the science of performance prediction has advanced over the past 100 years, many organisations continue to use...

Mark Blagrove on a land still stubbornly slow to offer up its secrets

Dreams can be a matter of great personal and scientific interest, or derision. There is good reason not to be interested in dreams: most are easily forgotten and usually appear senseless. Despite...

Alice M. Gregory and Nicola L. Barclay on whether stress early in life is linked to later sleep problems

Stress is common in early life, but is it associated with later sleep disturbance? This article reviews literature outlining longitudinal associations between stress early in life and subsequent...

Julia Santomauro and Christopher C. French examine the experience of sleep paralysis

Sleep paralysis can be a terrifying experience that is surprisingly common. It can involve the inability to move, auditory and visual hallucinations, a strong sense of presence, difficulty...

Dan Jones on the often surprising part played by moral judgements in our ‘folk psychology

In 2003, when George Bush and Tony Blair inaugurated the ongoing war in Iraq, both men surely knew that civilian deaths would be one of the costs of the military engagement. But did Bush or Blair...

Susanne Iqbal and Laura Pipon-Young with a step-by-step guide

The Delphi survey method is popular in many disciplines. Originally developed in the US as a means of forecasting future scenarios, this method has been used to determine the range of opinions on...

Lance Workman talks to Vicki Bruce about perception, £1 coins, dogs, and more in this interview from 2009.

Eric Robinson, winner in the postgraduate category of our student writer competition, weighs up the evidence

A huge number of people believe in some form of extra-sensory perception (ESP) and claim to have witnessed evidence of it first hand. But are they naive and misguided? And is it right to ignore...

In the winning undergraduate entry for our student writer competition, Gaby Pfeifer examines the relationship between sensory stimulation and savoir-vivre

Consumption of food is a universal and necessary act, and a variety of factors influence its selective choice. We are commonly tempted to think the reason we choose a particular food is that it is...

Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman speculate on the factors that could be behind a ‘21st-century fear'

Paranoia is the exaggerated or unrealistic idea that others wish to harm us (see Freeman, 2007). Often considered simply as a symptom of severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, the...

Deborah Cameron disposes of some widespread misconceptions about differences in the ways men and women use language

Many people hold firm beliefs about the differing ways in which men and women communicate, the reasons why they are different and the problems their differences cause. Yet surprisingly few of...

William J. Fear argues that people on incapacity benefit need a psychosocial intervention rooted in self-efficacy

Christian Hoppe and Jelena Stojanovic look towards the neural mechanics behind talent

In the study of neural activity underlying task performance, neuroscientists have discovered that different neural states arise in low and high performers on the same cognitive tasks. What then...

Alison Pike, Tina Kretschmer and Judith F. Dunn on what the research says about achieving a harmonious household

The vast majority of us have at least one brother or sister, yet sibling relationships have received scant attention in the UK. While many parents claim to have a second child as a ‘companion’ for...

Christian Jarrett on the benefits (and dangers) of using virtual worlds in your psychological research, therapy and teaching

This is not the only reality. Millions of people also exist online in virtual worlds, where they can fly, teleport, socialise and spend time inside a digital body of their own design....

Albert Bandura spoke to a packed audience at Friends House on 22 April about how he is abating urgent global problems by psychosocial means

Soaring population growth tops the list of global problems. Even with the present population of 6.7 billion we have outgrown the earth’s carrying capacity, but we are heading toward a population...

Daniel B. Wright first explains how to compare means with a bootstrap, and then Andy P. Field puts the method into use in regression analysis