...features

Sarah Riley, Hannah Frith, Louise Archer and Louise Veseley discuss women in psychology and The Psychologist.

Noting that there were fewer submissions to The Psychologist by women, the Psychologist Policy Committee asked us, via the Standing Committee for the Promotion of Equal Opportunities, to comment....

Educational failure is the root of many social problems; Sonia Jackson and Peter McParlin believe psychologists can help.

Children who grow up in local authority care, ‘looked after’ under the Children Act 1989, are four times more likely than others to require the help of mental health services; nine times more...

P. Alex Linley and Susan Harrington discuss academic and applied perspectives on strengths psychology.

What are your strengths? In everyday conversation people are generally modest and reluctant to talk about their strengths. When asked this question in an interview, most people feel slightly...

David Giles and John Maltby examine the current state of psychological research on celebrities and those who ‘worship’ them.

Imagine for a moment that you are famous. How different would your life be? For a start, you would be incredibly powerful. Feel hungry? Don’t bother walking to the shop to buy some lunch – you...

Catherine Butler, Lyndsey Moon and Meg Barker introduce the special issue. Alex Accoroni on some common misconceptions that can hinder a straight therapist in their work with LGB clients. Lyndsey Moon on sexual scripts and the language of difference.

Peter Bull with a contribution to the Society’s theme for the year – ‘Reducing conflict’.

Sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland has often been described in terms of a clash of identities between the Protestant British, who wish to remain part of the United Kingdom, and the Irish...

Jolanda Jetten, winner of the Society’s Spearman Medal 2004, outlines her research.

Just imagine: Your boss asks you to run a series of special training days
for other employees. At first you feel rather flattered that your boss is considering you for this task. But you...

Personal space - Ian Hodges and Jim McManus call for psychologists to be more proactive in challenging homophobia and sexual prejudice.
Speaking of sexual politics in psychology - a discussion between Peter Hegarty and David Hardman.
Myra J. Hird on what psychologists can learn from the huge range of non-human design and behaviour.
Meg Barker: Why I study...Bisexuality and beyond

Jim Cromwell on some tricky problems psychologists can face testing deaf people who use sign language.

Bob is a builder. He has been working for 40 years, and his tools have become extra limbs rather than inanimate aids. He has whole areas of cortex dedicated to plastering. Last month he returned...

John Marzillier with the latest in our series of psychological perspectives on fiction – and perhaps fictional perspectives on psychology.

In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel Tender is the Night, the charismatic psychiatrist Dick Diver falls for a beautiful heiress, Nicole Warren. He marries her but they don’t live happily ever after. Why...

Nobody likes you… what now? Roy Baumeister describes some surprising experimental effects, in the final contribution for the Society’s ‘Year of Relationships’.

‘The tribe has spoken.’ ‘You’re fired.’ ‘You may now leave the Big Brother house.’ The language and storylines of reality television focus relentlessly on rejection. Apparently the spectacle of...

Frank Tallis on Freud, Vienna, and the centenary of a landmark publication.

It has been one hundred years since the publication of Freud’s Three Essays on The Theory of Sexuality. Many would argue – with some justification – that it is the most important work of...

Peter K. Smith on an important and suprisingly underresrearched relationship.

Lynn Myers and Charles Abraham on helping patients to act on healthcare professionals’ advice.

DOCTORS and nurses spend much of their working time discussing and assessing patients’ healthcare problems and recommending actions which will help restore or maintain health. On the basis of...

Charles Abraham and Susan Michie on their work with the government’s Division of Public Health.

In the last few years non-medical specialisms have been recognised within UK public health and, at the same time, UK health psychology has developed a clearer public health focus.
In 2003...

Jane Wardle and Andrew Steptoe discuss how to take health psychology to the next level.

Health psychology had its origins in clinical psychology, social psychology and psychophysiology. Its traditional focus was on functioning at the level of the individual and understanding...

Guest editors Charles Abraham and Susan Michie introduce the special issue.

A healthy nation needs well-trained GPs and good hospitals delivering high-quality treatments. But prevention is better than cure, and these days preventive health behaviour is a government mantra...

Dave Bartram, winner of the Society’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology, on the role for psychologists in a new web-based era.

Psychological testing probably touches more people more often than any other application of psychology. We are tested from cradle to grave; as we progress through the educational system; when we...

Rod Nicolson comments on the recent Channel 4 programme and subsequent media coverage.

September’s Channel 4 Dispatches programme ‘The myth of dyslexia’, which was trailed as indicating that dyslexia is primarily an emotional construct, has certainly led to an ongoing outpouring of...

Ian J. Deary delivered the Hans Eysenck Memorial Lecture, on the new field of cognitive epidemiology, at the Annual Conference.

Whether you live to collect your old-age pension depends in part on your IQ at age 11. You just can’t keep a good predictor down.
Scores on psychometric intelligence tests (IQ for short) are...

John Read wonders what happened to the ‘psycho’ and ‘social’ in explanations of mental illness.

Peter Bull on oratory and the mistiming of applause.

Rhetorical techniques used by politicians to invite audience applause were the focus of intensive research by Max Atkinson (e.g., Atkinson, 1984). Just as conversationalists take it in turn to...

In a special web-only article inspired by the centenary celebrations, Eugene Sadler-Smith discusses how the composer was influenced by psychology.
Note: This is part of a continued attempt to integrate our print and web coverage and to offer something extra to members. Web-only material is not peer-reviewed, allowing us to deal more effectively with time-sensitive issues. The website can also host longer articles than we have room for in print, particularly at a time when submission rates and advertising levels remain high. If you are interested in writing a web-only article, e-mail the Editor on [email protected].

The late Sir Michael Tippett is widely acknowledged as being foremost amongst English composers of the mid- to late 20th century. He was born on 4 January 1905 and died on 8 January 1998, a few...

Anna Madill, Brendan Gough, Rebecca Lawton and Peter Stratton advise.

There is a ‘shortfall in numbers of highly skilled qualitative researchers’ says the Economic and Social Research Council (2004). What is psychology doing about it? The Society’s revised syllabus...

By Robin Goodwin.

PSychology offers us many interesting topics for study, but few capture the public imagination more than the study of close relationships. Our political leaders constantly refer to the importance...