...features

Deborah Cameron disposes of some widespread misconceptions about differences in the ways men and women use language

Many people hold firm beliefs about the differing ways in which men and women communicate, the reasons why they are different and the problems their differences cause. Yet surprisingly few of...

William J. Fear argues that people on incapacity benefit need a psychosocial intervention rooted in self-efficacy

Christian Hoppe and Jelena Stojanovic look towards the neural mechanics behind talent

In the study of neural activity underlying task performance, neuroscientists have discovered that different neural states arise in low and high performers on the same cognitive tasks. What then...

Alison Pike, Tina Kretschmer and Judith F. Dunn on what the research says about achieving a harmonious household

The vast majority of us have at least one brother or sister, yet sibling relationships have received scant attention in the UK. While many parents claim to have a second child as a ‘companion’ for...

Christian Jarrett on the benefits (and dangers) of using virtual worlds in your psychological research, therapy and teaching

This is not the only reality. Millions of people also exist online in virtual worlds, where they can fly, teleport, socialise and spend time inside a digital body of their own design....

Albert Bandura spoke to a packed audience at Friends House on 22 April about how he is abating urgent global problems by psychosocial means

Soaring population growth tops the list of global problems. Even with the present population of 6.7 billion we have outgrown the earth’s carrying capacity, but we are heading toward a population...

Daniel B. Wright first explains how to compare means with a bootstrap, and then Andy P. Field puts the method into use in regression analysis

John Hall and John Marzillier wrap up the opinion special with some constructive suggestions for moving the agenda on

The Layard analysis spawned the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiatives that are transforming the way psychological therapies are delivered in the NHS (Clark & Turpin,...

Patrick Casement with the third of our special opinion pieces on ‘improving access to psychological therapies’

My aim in this article is to consider some of the ways in which problem-focused therapies such as cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) may be attractive, but also some of the ways in which these...

Paul Gilbert with the second contribution to the opinion special

Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has recently emerged as a dominant paradigm in psychotherapy, and is influencing training and even our professional organisation (e.g. via graduate workers). It...

John Marzillier and John Hall introduce a collection of opinion pieces on ‘improving access to psychological therapies’

In 2006 the Mental Health Policy Group of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics published a report urging that psychological therapy should be made available to...

Christian Jarrett on a recent special issue from the US, and an invitation to come up with your own suggestions

Think again, suggests Nattavudh Powdthavee – you’re experiencing a focusing illusion

Perhaps one of the most surprising findings in well-being literature is that, although children give us many things, an increase in our average day-to-day positive experiences may not be among one...

Christopher Peterson and Nansook Park offer an optimistic view of the opportunities

There are good reasons to pursue happiness, but psychologists have been sceptical that happiness can be lastingly increased. What arguments have been advanced to explain why happiness cannot be...

Rebecca Johnson asks what control theory can contribute to our understanding of dissociative identity disorder

When a person presents with dissociative identity disorder, how can we best understand their condition? Is it a form of internal conflict? Is it the product of a troubled childhood and an internal...

Jonathan D. Raskin on how the way we organise information could be the key to reducing the negative labelling of others

Can the golden section, an odd but repeatedly confirmed hypothesis about how humans organise information, help us understand the powerful impact of stigma? Recent research suggests it might.

Julie Gore and Claire McAndrew explore advances in cognitive task analysis

Andy Field, winner of the Society’s Book Award, on how he makes use of eels, quails and lap dancers in his teaching

Many psychology students find themselves riddled with fear, boredom and often both at the prospect of learning statistics. Statistics anxiety and a lack of motivation are often cited as major...

Jadwiga Nazimek on whether exercise can delay – or even prevent – dementia

Exercise is a good treatment for many health problems, both physical and mental. It reduces physical frailty and might prolong the lifespan, but (in synergy with other factors, such as lifestyle...

Anna C. Phillips and Douglas Carroll on stress, health and death

Does psychological stress send us to an early grave? Although research shows links between stressful events and illness, there is conflicting evidence regarding the relationship between stress and...

Alexa Spence, Nick Pidgeon and David Uzzell consider psychology’s role in debating, combating and adapting to climate change

Climate change is a term on everybody’s lips at the moment. But what role can we, as psychologists – both individually and within our subdisciplinary groups – play in reducing, and adapting to the...

Rosemary Wright on the benefits of a conservation project as a form of therapy for people with learning disabilities

Castlebeck is an independent healthcare provider for people with learning disabilities who present severe challenges to services. I joined Castlebeck in July 2007, working alongside clinical...

Matthew C. Davis and Rose Challenger argue that it’s time for psychology to lead the way in greening individuals’ behaviours, especially in the workplace

Climate change is generally accepted as the largest single issue facing humankind in the 21st century. So why is it then that we, as psychologists, appear to be so quiet on the topic? We believe...

Stuart Biddle thinks so, but Terry Dovey disagrees…

Nick Neave and Daryl B. O’Connor describe their research into the complex effects of this hormone

The steroid hormone testosterone has long been associated with various male-typical behaviours. This review first highlights key issues in behavioural endocrinology, and then provides a brief...