...features

Nobody likes you… what now? Roy Baumeister describes some surprising experimental effects, in the final contribution for the Society’s ‘Year of Relationships’.

‘The tribe has spoken.’ ‘You’re fired.’ ‘You may now leave the Big Brother house.’ The language and storylines of reality television focus relentlessly on rejection. Apparently the spectacle of...

Frank Tallis on Freud, Vienna, and the centenary of a landmark publication.

It has been one hundred years since the publication of Freud’s Three Essays on The Theory of Sexuality. Many would argue – with some justification – that it is the most important work of...

Peter K. Smith on an important and suprisingly underresrearched relationship.

Lynn Myers and Charles Abraham on helping patients to act on healthcare professionals’ advice.

DOCTORS and nurses spend much of their working time discussing and assessing patients’ healthcare problems and recommending actions which will help restore or maintain health. On the basis of...

Charles Abraham and Susan Michie on their work with the government’s Division of Public Health.

In the last few years non-medical specialisms have been recognised within UK public health and, at the same time, UK health psychology has developed a clearer public health focus.
In 2003...

Jane Wardle and Andrew Steptoe discuss how to take health psychology to the next level.

Health psychology had its origins in clinical psychology, social psychology and psychophysiology. Its traditional focus was on functioning at the level of the individual and understanding...

Guest editors Charles Abraham and Susan Michie introduce the special issue.

A healthy nation needs well-trained GPs and good hospitals delivering high-quality treatments. But prevention is better than cure, and these days preventive health behaviour is a government mantra...

Dave Bartram, winner of the Society’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology, on the role for psychologists in a new web-based era.

Psychological testing probably touches more people more often than any other application of psychology. We are tested from cradle to grave; as we progress through the educational system; when we...

Rod Nicolson comments on the recent Channel 4 programme and subsequent media coverage.

September’s Channel 4 Dispatches programme ‘The myth of dyslexia’, which was trailed as indicating that dyslexia is primarily an emotional construct, has certainly led to an ongoing outpouring of...

Ian J. Deary delivered the Hans Eysenck Memorial Lecture, on the new field of cognitive epidemiology, at the Annual Conference.

Whether you live to collect your old-age pension depends in part on your IQ at age 11. You just can’t keep a good predictor down.
Scores on psychometric intelligence tests (IQ for short) are...

John Read wonders what happened to the ‘psycho’ and ‘social’ in explanations of mental illness.

Peter Bull on oratory and the mistiming of applause.

Rhetorical techniques used by politicians to invite audience applause were the focus of intensive research by Max Atkinson (e.g., Atkinson, 1984). Just as conversationalists take it in turn to...

In a special web-only article inspired by the centenary celebrations, Eugene Sadler-Smith discusses how the composer was influenced by psychology.
Note: This is part of a continued attempt to integrate our print and web coverage and to offer something extra to members. Web-only material is not peer-reviewed, allowing us to deal more effectively with time-sensitive issues. The website can also host longer articles than we have room for in print, particularly at a time when submission rates and advertising levels remain high. If you are interested in writing a web-only article, e-mail the Editor on [email protected].

The late Sir Michael Tippett is widely acknowledged as being foremost amongst English composers of the mid- to late 20th century. He was born on 4 January 1905 and died on 8 January 1998, a few...

Anna Madill, Brendan Gough, Rebecca Lawton and Peter Stratton advise.

There is a ‘shortfall in numbers of highly skilled qualitative researchers’ says the Economic and Social Research Council (2004). What is psychology doing about it? The Society’s revised syllabus...

By Robin Goodwin.

PSychology offers us many interesting topics for study, but few capture the public imagination more than the study of close relationships. Our political leaders constantly refer to the importance...

Sergio Della Sala on the bizarre ‘Dr Strangelove syndrome’ and what it tells us about free will.

Paul Singh Ghuman on Asian girls in the West.

Meera Syal describes her life as schizophrenic, acknowledging that much of the creative impetus for her writing and performing comes from the clash of two cultures she has grown up with… ‘a lot of...

Sharon Smart (the Society’s Assistant Press Officer) meets educational psychologist Alan McLean.

WHEN a pupil ‘can’t be bothered’ with school it is often difficult to have sympathy if they then fail to succeed academically. Even teachers may struggle to be supportive, seeing the youngster’s...

Tony Manstead and Margie Wetherell introduce a special issue on the state of UK social psychology, with lessons for all. With articles by Russell Spears, Wendy Hollway and Derek Edwards ('Three views on hate'), Stephen Reicher and Stephanie Taylor ('Similarities and differences between traditions'), S. Alexander Haslam and Brian Parkinson ('Pulling together or pulling apart? Towards organic pluralism in social psychology'), and Stephen Reicher again ('Where next?').

UK social psychology is highly distinctive – nowhere else in the world is the field of academic social psychology so clearly divided into different camps. Major differences in approach and...

Susan Johnson with a letter from across the Atlantic.

IT is the British Psychological Society’s Year of Relationships. Surely the time to write to my colleagues in the UK (the country of my birth) about the changes occurring here in North America in...

Constantine Sedikides delivered the Michael Argyle Lecture at this year’s Annual Conference.

Humans are social animals. We spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about people, interacting with them, influencing them and being influenced by them. We crave social contact and find our...

Joint winner of the Presidents’ Award, Tony Manstead, describes his research.

Emotion colours all our lives, but until relatively recently it had not been a focus for psychological theory and research. Things began to change in the 1980s, with the establishment of...

Reason and the 'yuck' factor - Both reason and emotion inform moral judgements, but which is in the driving seat? Sarah Lee, winner in the undergraduate category, investigates.
The unbearable lightness of procrastination - Cedric Ginestet with the winning entry in the postgraduate category.

Peter Hepper on the embryonic science of fetal psychology.

The history of man for the nine months preceding his birth would, probably, be far more interesting and contain events of greater moment than for all the three score and ten years that follow it...

Guest editor Pat Frankish introduces the special issue.

Psychology and other knowledge-based professions could sensitise the political and administrative community on the outcomes for those with a disability. Psychology could play a role in the...