...features

Mark Griffiths gives his practical recommendations based on psychological theory and research.

Although gambling is clearly of psychological interest and is a topic that The Psychologist has examined (see Orford, 2002), traditionally it has not been viewed as a public health matter (see...

Ian J. Deary, winner of the Society’s 2002 Book Award, ‘looks down’ on a controversial area in this article from October 2003. 

Broadcaster Nick Ross on what psychology did for him.

I EXPECTED psychology to teach me how to look into people’s eyes and gain access to their souls. So, to tell you the truth, I was surprised to have to learn about neural pathways and bewildered at...

Articles by Howard Gardner (Higher Education in the era of globalisation), Barry Jones (Alcohol consumption on the campus), Hazel Willis, Margaret Stroebe and Miles Hewstone (Homesick blues), and Rowan Bayne (Love, money and studying: You and your personality type at university).

Our members are a diverse bunch. The one area of common ground is that you have all got a psychology degree, or you are in the process of trying to get one. Maybe your contact with higher...

Ian H. Robertson gave the Myers Lecture at
the 2003 Annual Conference – Now pay attention.

At 17.24 on 8 August 1996 the London Euston to Milton Keynes train passed through a red signal near Watford Junction and ploughed into an empty goods train, killing my colleague Ruth Holland, an...

Michael J. Apter's Personal Space

Those of us who are researchers in psychology are privileged to be working on the most interesting phenomena imaginable. But I fancy that there are times when we do not really look at them. Or...

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, winner of the 2002 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology, investigated our ‘self-monitoring’ mechanism and what happens when it fails.

My fingers pick up the pen, but I don’t control them. What they do is nothing to do with me. (Mellors, 1970, p.13)
DELUSIONS of alien control are symptoms associated with schizophrenia in...

Janet Sayers on the potential of a meeting
of psychoanalysis, neuropsychology and religion.

Like many psychologists I do not believe in God. But I am intrigued by religious and mystical experience. I am also happy to credit the healing effects of the revelatory experience of feeling...

Usha Goswami gave this year’s Broadbent Lecture at the Annual Conference, suggesting that the rhyme and rhythm of different languages holds the key to dyslexia.

Why do some children learn to read well, while others of similar intellectual ability struggle to become proficient? And why is a Finnish child reading with 90 per cent accuracy by the 10th week...

Jim McCourt met Dr Louis D. Kramer and Jill Bellingham to discuss the work of the Society’s Professional Conduct Board.

FOLLOWING a distinguished career in dentistry, Dr Louis Kramer joined the Disciplinary Board (now renamed the Professional Conduct Board) as a lay member in 1993. He will finish
his second...

Patrick Davies and Zara Lipsey look at the disturbing rise
of pro-anorexia websites.

ALTHOUGH often a positive communication and information tool, the internet has its sinister side. Publicity involving internet chatrooms and paedophiles has highlighted some of the risks involved...

Vaughan Bell, Peter Halligan and Hadyn Ellis on the sometimes fine line between normality and abnormality.

Early in his third month of office, President Reagan was on his way to address a conference when John Hinckley fired six gun shots at point blank range, wounding the president and three of his...

At the Annual Conference in Bournemouth, Graham Davey gave his Presidential Address.

WHAT is clinical psychology research? Did you do a practical class in it during your undergraduate degree? The chances are that you didn’t. Is it a core content area of the curriculum? Usually not...

Adrian C. North and David J. Hargreaves on two common misconceptions.

PERHAPS, before starting to read this article, you thought ‘Is it worth my while, since it’s only about music?’ Like millions, you may like to listen to the car radio on the drive home from work,...

Miles Hewstone, winner of the 2001 Presidents’ Award, on a key social psychological strategy for reducing intergroup conflict.

It is nearly 50 years since Gordon Allport, in his classic volume The Nature of Prejudice, expounded on the ‘contact hypothesis’ for future generations of social psychologists and policy makers....

In the May issue John Donnelly spoke out in favour of the Rorschach test, but Robert Forde thinks psychologists could face legal action if they follow his advice.

JOHN Donnelly suggests that the Rorschach is ‘as valid as other personality tests’. He also ascribes the widespread criticisms of the Rorschach in the US to a ‘vocal minority’, giving the...

Stephen Joseph believes client-centred psychotherapy is a misunderstood approach with profound significance.

THE profession of psychology has traditionally had an uneasy relationship with the profession
of psychotherapy. However, times are changing and the British Psychological Society is now in...

Claire Hewson looks at the pros and cons.

Can psychological research studies conducted via the internet provide valid and reliable data? This question is becoming more and more pressing as an increasing number of psychologists take...

Linda Clare, Alan Baddeley, Esme Moniz-Cook and Bob Woods discuss advances in the understanding of dementia.

Dementia is ‘prima facie a psychological disorder’ (Morris & McKiernan, 1994), but the psychological needs of people with dementia are often ignored. Why is dementia a neglected area for...

Lucy Johnstone takes a look at a controversial therapy, still being used in the UK.

A PSYCHOLOGIST recently suggested that commenting on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was outside our arena of professional responsibility (Gelsthorpe, 1997). I disagree.
Although clinical...

What’s it like to smell pain and taste words? Jamie Ward on the unusual world of the synaesthete.

What colour is the letter A? What does the number 1 taste of? Does listening to music, speaking or eating food produce colours, shapes or textures? For most people, questions such as these will...

Rufus May, Janice Hartley and Tamasin Knight give their views on the government proposals to introduce Community Treatment Orders.

Guest editors P. Alex Linley, Stephen Joseph and Ilona Boniwell welcome you to the special issue on positive psychology.

Positive psychology was launched with Martin Seligman’s APA Presidential Address in 1998. The first American Psychologist of the new millennium (January 2000, Vol. 55) was dedicated to positive...

Dave O’Mara and Annalu Waller on using humour to help language-impaired children to communicate and participate.

Anne’s speech is difficult to understand. At the age of 10 she has already used several alternative means of communication including manual signs, a symbol chart and a voice-output communication...

David Giles interviews Martyn Barrett.

It is a quiet Friday at the University of Surrey. The campus shimmers on the hillside in summer sunshine; a few postgrads lie on the grass, perhaps contemplating England’s exit from the World Cup...