...features

Constantine Sedikides delivered the Michael Argyle Lecture at this year’s Annual Conference.

Humans are social animals. We spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about people, interacting with them, influencing them and being influenced by them. We crave social contact and find our...

Joint winner of the Presidents’ Award, Tony Manstead, describes his research.

Emotion colours all our lives, but until relatively recently it had not been a focus for psychological theory and research. Things began to change in the 1980s, with the establishment of...

Reason and the 'yuck' factor - Both reason and emotion inform moral judgements, but which is in the driving seat? Sarah Lee, winner in the undergraduate category, investigates.
The unbearable lightness of procrastination - Cedric Ginestet with the winning entry in the postgraduate category.

Peter Hepper on the embryonic science of fetal psychology.

The history of man for the nine months preceding his birth would, probably, be far more interesting and contain events of greater moment than for all the three score and ten years that follow it...

Guest editor Pat Frankish introduces the special issue.

Psychology and other knowledge-based professions could sensitise the political and administrative community on the outcomes for those with a disability. Psychology could play a role in the...

Sophia Jowett with a contribution to the Society’s ‘Year of Relationships’.

Victoria Clarke, Carole Burgoyne and Maree Burns with a contribution to the Society’s ‘Year of Relationships’ in 2005.

Tomás Chamorro-Premuzic and Adrian Furnham look to understand, assess and predict individual differences in achievement.

Most applied psychologists – clinical, educational, organisational – feel the need to use cognitive ability tests for specific diagnostic purposes or educational and personnel selection. However...

Phil Stringer talks to Frank Coffield about his research into learning styles, an increasingly popular area.

Pioneering work in participant observation with Glasgow gangs, a study of unemployed young adults in the North East of England, and a survey of vandalism and graffiti… Frank Coffield has...

At the 2005 Annual Conference in Manchester, Steven Tipper gave his Presidents’ Award Lecture on the retrieval of attention processes from memory.

Two of the most central aspects of human cognitive processes are attention and memory. Attention enables us to find objects that are of importance to us in complex environments, and to focus our...

Jennifer Brown

‘Your report made a difference’ said the barrister, telling me that a woman officer had accepted an out-of-court settlement after a 15-year legal battle to acknowledge her harassment within the...

Peter Forster introduces the latest in our international series – but with a difference.

WheN The Psychologist began its series of international articles, I was working in Vanuatu, a Y-shaped chain of 80 inhabited islands between Fiji to the east and Queensland, Australia, to the west...

As pressure grows on food advertisers, Jason C.G. Halford looks at the evidence.

Andrew J. Hill examines the evidence concerning the psychosocial consequences of childhood obesity.

Obesity is now firmly on the UK’s health agenda, and children are increasingly the number one priority. Those already overweight or obese need immediate and expert help. Those who are not are...

Stuart Biddle and Trish Gorely investigate.

'The kids of today! Too much telly and texting – it’s making them fat!’ is a common refrain in the media and in general conversation. Indeed, the strong rise in obesity in young people over...

In response to our special issue Gustav Jahoda sets out a different historical analysis of cross-cultural psychology and finds the concepts of ‘indigenous psychology’ and ‘universal psychology’ hard to pin down.

IN their February special issue ‘Bringing psychology to all societies’, the three contributors (Ingrid Lunt, Kwang-Kuo Hwang and Carl Martin Allwood) dealt with some important though controversial...

Stephen Joseph interviews Professor David Lane, Chair of the BPS Register of Psychologists Specialising in Psychotherapy, about psychotherapy and the establishment of this new professional route within the BPS.

Jane Ogden argues that psychological solutions are not always best.

Obesity is mainly seen by health professionals as a psychological problem relating to beliefs and two key behaviours – overeating and underactivity. As a result, obesity has traditionally been...

Paul Chadwick and Helen Croker on why psychological intervention is the best option.

AS anyone who has tried to lose weight will know, it is not easy. Rely on willpower or calorie counting alone, and try as you might you can’t squeeze into that smaller size. But surely some...

Jane Wardle on how environments, genes and behaviour interact to cause obesity – and what psychologists can do about it.

Obesity is associated with serious health risks. The odds
of contracting diabetes, coronary heart disease, cancer and arthritis are markedly higher in obese than in normal-weight adults (...

Psychologist editor Jon Sutton introduces part one of a special feature.

There are few issues that genuinely touch both the working and everyday lives of the majority of our readers, but obesity is one. Several different types of psychologist – health, social, sport...

Steve Duck with a new model of relationship breakup.

If you have never experienced relationship breakup, then there is a place reserved for you in the psychological equivalent of Madame Tussauds. Yet despite the ubiquity of the experiences of...

The Psychologist’s editor, Jon Sutton, presents the results of a Society investigation.

PSYCHOLOGY – telling you things you already know in words you don’t understand. Over the years I’ve heard that a lot; from friends and family, journalists, even from other psychologists. Wouldn’t...

Rodger Ll. Wood discusses how head injury can affect personal relationships.

Do you know what it feels like for me to wake up every morning, look at the man in bed next to me, and wish it was the man I married, not the monster I live with now?

Alex Hossack and Gemma Wall ask whether we’re still ignoring vital allies in our practice.

AS psychologists, many of us go through years of training and supervision in order to help others through their problems. But if you were an alcoholic, or suffering with depression, wouldn’t you...