...features

Anne Cannon, winner in the undergraduate category, asks why consciousness plays such a limited role in psychology degree courses; and Makala Balls, winner in the postgraduate category, looks at prevention – psychology’s forgotten mission?

Gareth E. Hagger-Johnson and Martha C. Pollard Whiteman with five potential applications of research linking personality traits and health outcomes

Evidence that personality traits are related to health behaviours and health outcomes is emerging. This is interesting, but is it important? How can psychologists and healthcare professionals...

Kimberley A. Wade and Cara Laney on why your most treasured childhood memory may be false

Oscar Wilde described memory as ‘the diary that we all carry about’. Autobiographical memory defines us – it is the foundation on which we build our identity, so we like to believe that our...

We are all heading for the grave in an indifferent universe. How do we cope with such existential concerns? Dan Jones investigates

Spearman Medal winner Chris Chambers looks at what human brain
stimulation can tell us

Put a copper coil against the scalp, pass a current through it and the magnetic field produced temporarily interferes with the normal functioning of neurons in the cortex below. By measuring the...

Esther Hansen and Alex Clarke, clinical psychologists in a hospital department of plastic and reconstructive surgery, on what they have to offer

How can psychologists contribute to people’s understanding of the effects of their unusual appearance, and help them to modify its impact on their lives? How do their beliefs shape their hopes for...

Psychosocial adjustment to visible difference Tim Moss and Ben Rosser examine outcomes and explanations

Some years ago, a plastic surgeon contacted the Centre for Appearance Research with a problem. Why was it, he wanted to know, that although there was great diversity in the extent of physically...

James Partridge and Adam Pearson give personal perspectives on visible difference, and outline a view of the way ahead

Diana Harcourt and Nichola Rumsey introduce the special issue

We all have a unique appearance, but some people’s appearance might be considered particularly unusual when compared with the prevailing, culturally defined ‘norm’: for example, those with a skin...

Paul W. Eastwick and Eli J. Finkel argue that this unusual data collection technique is high in external and internal validity

Every night, researchers who investigate relationships and person perception miss out on great opportunities. Millions of parties and social gatherings take place throughout the world, and no one...

Melanie Gunning examines maternal anxiety in pregnancy

The effects of anxiety in pregnancy on fetal and postnatal development are of concern for most women who are, or have been, pregnant. But how are the effects transmitted to the growing fetus, and...

Emily Pryce-Jenkins and Tanya Woolf look at how an intermediate psychological service can stop clients falling through the net

What happens to people with moderately severe psychological problems, too complex for primary care to help with, but not so severe that a community mental health team (CMHT) would be appropriate?...

Joanna Blake and Nicholas Maiese on the links with language and cognitive development in this 2008 article.

Today’s parents are inundated with new solutions to help young children improve their reading ability. For parents hoping to raise a literate child, the best option may be one that’s been around...

In her Presidents’ Award Lecture at the Annual Conference, Susan E. Gathercole looked at identifying and supporting children with poor working memory

Poor working memory skills are relatively commonplace in childhood, and have a substantial advance impact on children’s learning. This article describes the profile of cognitive and behavioural...

Miles Thomas with a call to professional arms on a topic that many of us find of personal interest.

What can psychology add to our understanding of wine? Universities in Bordeaux, California, the Rhine and South Australia recognise wine as a subject worthy of study, with the production process...

Rachel L. Kendal examines the evidence from the wild. What constitutes culture, do animals have it, and what does it mean for psychologists?

If we observe orang-utans blowing raspberries before bedtime, what does this mean? And why should psychologists, with their focus on human behaviour, be interested? This article looks at what...

Viren Swami, Debbi Stanistreet and Sarah Payne examine a relationship that has largely been taken for granted

More women than men attempt suicide, but many more men are successful. Until recently most psychological explanations of this difference have focused on biological aspects, and have largely...

Robin Dunbar argues that debates over the role of evolution in psychology have been largely misplaced

Although evolution played a significant role in psychology and the social sciences during the late 19th century, the opening decades of the 20th century witnessed a profound parting of the ways....

Gwyneth Doherty-Sneddon on an area where academia meets public interest

An augmentative communication approach, ‘baby signing’ teaches babies keyword signing that they can use to communicate before they can talk. The movement is increasingly popular with...

Christian Jarrett examines the psychology of nonconscious influences

Thirty years ago, a researcher pushed in front of people who were about to use a library photocopier, with the excuse ‘Because I have to make copies’. This statement, though nonsensical, boosted...

A new section to The Psychologist which this month focuses on improved analysis of covariance and the perils of statistics by numbers...

We all have one, and it might determine our fate in a number of intriguing and bizarre ways. Nicholas Christenfeld and Britta Larsen investigate.

Names have meanings – historical, geographical, occupational, and so on – that transcend the individual, and while people do occasionally change their names to match their characters, the most...

Richard J. Crisp, joint winner of the Society’s Spearman Medal 2006, outlines his latest research.

From gender discrimination to inter-ethnic conflict, social categories define our experience of intergroup relations. This article discusses 10 years of research into the psychology of social...

Anna C. Phillips and Victoria E. Burns on why vaccinations are so interesting to psychologists

Next time you get flu or a cold after a particularly difficult week, don’t dismiss it as coincidence. Interdisciplinary work between psychologists and immunologists has shown that factors like...

Mark Hayward, winner of the Society’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology, joins with Mike Slade to discuss the recovery movement

Readers will be familiar with the issues and complexities related to the processes of defining and diagnosing emotional and mental distress. In last year’s special issue (...