...features

Carl Martin Allwood discusses some of the practical problems with taking an indigenous approach.

WE would all like our work to be relevant and useful to society, and psychology is fulfilling at least some of its promise in this respect. But the way psychology is going about realising its true...

Kwang-Kuo Hwang shows how psychological study has been inextricably linked with sociocultural history.

Since the end of World War II there have been three large-scale academic movements attempting to incorporate non-Western cultural factors into psychological research: modernisation theory,...

Ingrid Lunt on achievements and challenges in the international organisation of psychology.

Although American psychology continues to occupy a dominant position in most of the world, there
is an increasing awareness in many countries of the need to develop psychology as a science...

Guest Editors Manfusa Shams and Paul Jackson introduce the special issue.

Since the first laboratory experiments by Wilhelm Wundt in 1898, psychology has developed rapidly. No longer reliant on the white-coated Prof studying rats or, at best, students in a lab,...

Frank Tallis asks whether psychologists should take lovesickness more seriously.

Truly, madly, deeply. If you haven’t actually said those words, you’ve probably thought them – and they are very revealing. They suggest that, as a society, we consider ‘madness’ to be as...

Judy Dunn kicks off the Society’s ‘Year of Relationships’ with a look at children’s relationships with their non-resident fathers.

WHEN parents separate, most children end up living with their mothers. With the rapid rise in parental separation and divorce over the last two decades, this means that increasing numbers of...

Keith Nichols believes that years of research have failed to improve the psychological care of ill and injured people.

Visit your local hospital, pick a ward at random, go with the clinical nurse manager to the third bed on the right and ask, ‘Who is handling this patient’s psychological care and how is it going...

Katie Reid, Paul Flowers and Michael Larkin give an introduction to interpretative phenomenological analysis.

UNDERSTANDING experience is the very bread and butter of psychology, and interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA: Smith, 1996) offers psychologists the opportunity to learn from the insights...

George Shouksmith with the latest in our international series.

Back in the 1960s a radio interviewer asked Spike Milligan what he thought of New Zealand. ‘I visited there,’ Spike replied, ‘but I found it was closed!’ Yet at around the same period Austin...

Rudolf N. Cardinal, joint winner of the Societys 2002 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology, writes about his work.

We and other animals are driven to act by rewards, be they primary biological rewards like food, shelter and sex, or more complex social or personal goals. When animals act, they are sometimes...

Can caffeine actually keep you fit and healthy into old age? Rebecca Thompson and Karen Keene investigate.

Stop to think for a moment how much caffeine do you consume in a single day? Would you be able to make it through the day without a fix of caffeine at breakfast or mid-afternoon? Its all around...

Alan S. Brown asks whether we can hope to study this intriguing phenomenon scientifically.

I was at a friends house for the first time, and his mother was serving dinner. All the food was on the table except the ham, and immediately after it was placed on the table, the room sort of...

Sarah M. Coyne on a new twist in the media violence debate.

Throughout history people have found violence and aggression entertaining. The Romans cheered in colossal arenas as gladiators were brutally murdered. In medieval England spectators applauded as...

Daniel Freeman and Philippa A. Garety take a look at the psychology of paranoia.

Suspicions amongst thoughts are like bats amongst birds – they ever fly by twilight. Certainly they are to be repressed, or, at the least, well guarded. For they cloud the mind, they lose friends...

In his Hans Eysenck Lecture, Martin Davies describes how he has continued to integrate the correlational and experimental in the study of personality and cognition.

HANS Eysenck was one of the first people to combine what Cronbach (1957) called the two disciplines of scientific psychology – the correlational and the experimental. In this article I’ll describe...

Kausar Suhail with the latest in our international series.

Since its birth in 1947 the Islamic Republic of Pakistan has seen considerable political turmoil and unrest. A rich traditional life has been handed down through generations; the near century of...

Darren Ellis and John Cromby on the health implications of emotional expression.

HOW many times have you been asked ‘How are you?’ and, regardless of how you were actually feeling, replied with a simple ‘Fine’? Or asked someone ‘Are you OK?’, and nodded whilst asking in order...

Michael A. West (Chair of the Society’s Journals Committee) provides guidance and encouragement in
a vital activity.

FROM time to time many of you are asked by editors of BPS journals to review an article. With apologies to Robert Pirsig (author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) we now embark on a...

Mark Burton on the contribution of Ignacio Martín-Baró and his followers.

A UNIVERSITY campus, 16 November 1989. Eight people lie dead – six academic staff, their housekeeper and her daughter, all victims of an elite battalion of the El Salvador army, trained and funded...

Avril Rea looks at the growing challenge of working with interpreters.

With increased global migration the psychology profession has begun to provide services to a very diverse population. The 1991 Great Britain census revealed 81 nationalities, and Emerson and...

Jules Davidoff delivered the C.S. Myers Lecture at the 2004 Annual Conference.

CHARLES Myers became one of the founding fathers of British psychology (see Costall, 1998) as a result of going on an expedition to the Torres Straits (off New Guinea) organised from Cambridge...

Esther Burkitt on whether those pictures stuck to the fridge are really a window to a child’s mind.

IMAGINE a child runs up to you full of excitement, thrusting a drawing into your hands. You see two giant figures, coloured in murky shades of browns and greys, apparently fighting. Would you...

Andrew Silke looks at the responses, obstacles and ways forward.

How much do psychologists really know about terrorism? It has been around for a long time, but it was not until the end of the 1960s that terrorism began to attract any degree of meaningful...

Mark Bennett delivered the Michael Argyle Lecture at the Society’s 2004 Annual Conference.

The structures and processes underlying the self and human identity are as fundamental to psychological inquiry as it is possible to imagine. These topics have occupied social psychology’s centre...

Jonathan St B.T. Evans takes a satirical look back from the future.

I am honoured to accept the presidency of the British Psychological Society. For today’s lecture I have chosen to review the state of academic psychology in the UK, and especially to record my...