...features

Esther Burkitt on whether those pictures stuck to the fridge are really a window to a child’s mind.

IMAGINE a child runs up to you full of excitement, thrusting a drawing into your hands. You see two giant figures, coloured in murky shades of browns and greys, apparently fighting. Would you...

Andrew Silke looks at the responses, obstacles and ways forward.

How much do psychologists really know about terrorism? It has been around for a long time, but it was not until the end of the 1960s that terrorism began to attract any degree of meaningful...

Mark Bennett delivered the Michael Argyle Lecture at the Society’s 2004 Annual Conference.

The structures and processes underlying the self and human identity are as fundamental to psychological inquiry as it is possible to imagine. These topics have occupied social psychology’s centre...

Jonathan St B.T. Evans takes a satirical look back from the future.

I am honoured to accept the presidency of the British Psychological Society. For today’s lecture I have chosen to review the state of academic psychology in the UK, and especially to record my...

Cedric E. Ginestet and Elisabeth Spitz with the latest in our international series.

GEOGRAPHICALLY and ethnically, France is at the crossroads of Europe. The existence of natural boundaries accelerated the formation of the French nation, which rapidly became the most populous in...

Dorothy Bishop.

I must have been around four years old when I was first made aware that I was different. I was cheerfully colouring in a picture, when someone remarked, ‘Oh, she’s left-handed.’ In general, my...

Tony Ward and Frederick Hickling with the latest in our international series.

Sun-drenched beaches fringed by palm trees and turquoise waters, an abundance of rum, a laid-back atmosphere… as the largest of the English-speaking Caribbean islands, Jamaica shapes the view many...

Presidents’ Award winner Margaret J. Snowling looks at risk and protective factors.

A CHILD’s first words are a momentous occasion, but for many parents late talking goes unnoticed. If the child is the firstborn of the family, no comparisons can be made, and relatives may...

Martyn Barrett (University of Surrey) interviews Paul A. Singh Ghuman, who retires this month from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

Paul Ghuman moves with ease between the worlds of education and psychology. Until the end of August he holds the post of Professor of Education at Aberystwyth, he is a Fellow of the BPS, a Fellow...

Lih-Mei Liao and Mary Boyle guest edit this special issue. Iain Morland exposes the psychoanalytic roots of modern surgical management of intersexuality; Celia Kitzinger discusses the implications of intersexuality for the psychology of women; Melissa Hines writes on the role of hormones in brain development and behaviour; and Lih-Mei Liao and Mary Boyle ask what we can learn from intersex people themselves.

In the undergraduate category, Alexa Ispas looks at repairing historical rifts - is collective guilt the answer? Then in the postgraduate category, Susan Rasmussen looks at the imperfection of perfectionism.

John Marzillier argues against ‘outcome research’.

Evidence-based psychotherapy seems a reasonable aspiration. There are many weird and wonderful treatments in the field; surely it makes sense to know whether or not they work? This was the...

Gerard Bailes looks for the reality behind the TV depictions.

Protected only by his designer suit, the police psychologist strolls calmly past the firearms unit, who are crouched behind a brick wall and sweating in heavy body armour. Sharing a joke with them...

By Graham C.L. Davey

Research can be great fun when it involves leaving a heavily used handkerchief on a chair (made all the more interesting with a dollop of wallpaper paste), placing some dog faeces on a table (...

Do we believe in magic? And if we do, then why? Eugene Subbotsky investigates.

IS there any connection between the thought process of an adult refusing to walk under a ladder and a child scared by a toy lion that has ‘come to life’? How can magical thinking protect us, or...

Mark Van Vugt on how leaders can encourage loyalty and sacrifice.

Leaders of all types – of nations, ethnic and religious communities, businesses and teams – often call upon individuals to make sacrifices for the group, especially during wars, recessions,...

Dorothy Fielding (Vice Chair of the Division of Clinical Psychology) interviews Til Wykes about the Mental Health Research Network.

Slovenia joins the European Union this month, and its psychologists are keen to develop their subject and structures in line with the rest of Europe. Here, Velko S. Rus and Vid Pec<caron>jak outline the history and current state of Slovenian psychology.

Slovenia was the first region
to break away from the former Yugoslavia, publicly declaring its independence in 1991. After 10 days of aggression by the Yugoslav army on Slovenia, its...

Brinder Bains and Priti Shah on a new role for psychologists.

Imagine the scene. It’s 10am; an overworked GP has already seen 15 patients walk through his door. His next patient is John, who sits down and begins to describe feeling low in mood, tearful and...

In the latest of our interviews explaining the Society’s directorate structure, we meet Professor Dominic Abrams (Chair of the Research Board), followed by Ray Miller (Chair of the Professional Practice Board).

Hugh Foot and Alison Sanford on the practical and ethical issues involved in using students in research.

STUDENTS play a crucial role in research: some authors have even called them human ‘fruit flies’ (e.g. Keith-Spiegel & Koocher, 1985; Rubenstein, 1982). They are available in abundance,...

Helga Dittmar on consumer society and its effects on our sense of identity.

Imagine I gave you a list of attributes that describe a person – friendly, unique, assertive, self-reliant – and then asked you to judge whether having each of these qualities is either intrinsic...

Including articles by Sally Olohan (student mental health), Patrick Leman (subject choice and degree performance), Christine Howe (small group teaching) and Charles Crook (technology in teaching).

Irvine S. Gersch, winner of the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology 2002, on how to ensure that educational psychologists meet the needs of the country.

My work over the past three decades has left me in no doubt that educational psychologists have a unique and useful contribution to make for children, families, schools, LEAs and communities....

Lindsay O’Dell, Guida de Abreu and Sarah O’Toole look at the role of culture in psychology.

World events since 11 September 2001 have brought the need for understanding of cultural difference to the fore. Psychologists have a major part to play addressing issues such as identity,...