...features

Stephen Joseph believes client-centred psychotherapy is a misunderstood approach with profound significance.

THE profession of psychology has traditionally had an uneasy relationship with the profession
of psychotherapy. However, times are changing and the British Psychological Society is now in...

Claire Hewson looks at the pros and cons.

Can psychological research studies conducted via the internet provide valid and reliable data? This question is becoming more and more pressing as an increasing number of psychologists take...

Linda Clare, Alan Baddeley, Esme Moniz-Cook and Bob Woods discuss advances in the understanding of dementia.

Dementia is ‘prima facie a psychological disorder’ (Morris & McKiernan, 1994), but the psychological needs of people with dementia are often ignored. Why is dementia a neglected area for...

Lucy Johnstone takes a look at a controversial therapy, still being used in the UK.

A PSYCHOLOGIST recently suggested that commenting on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was outside our arena of professional responsibility (Gelsthorpe, 1997). I disagree.
Although clinical...

What’s it like to smell pain and taste words? Jamie Ward on the unusual world of the synaesthete.

What colour is the letter A? What does the number 1 taste of? Does listening to music, speaking or eating food produce colours, shapes or textures? For most people, questions such as these will...

Rufus May, Janice Hartley and Tamasin Knight give their views on the government proposals to introduce Community Treatment Orders.

Guest editors P. Alex Linley, Stephen Joseph and Ilona Boniwell welcome you to the special issue on positive psychology.

Positive psychology was launched with Martin Seligman’s APA Presidential Address in 1998. The first American Psychologist of the new millennium (January 2000, Vol. 55) was dedicated to positive...

Dave O’Mara and Annalu Waller on using humour to help language-impaired children to communicate and participate.

Anne’s speech is difficult to understand. At the age of 10 she has already used several alternative means of communication including manual signs, a symbol chart and a voice-output communication...

David Giles interviews Martyn Barrett.

It is a quiet Friday at the University of Surrey. The campus shimmers on the hillside in summer sunshine; a few postgrads lie on the grass, perhaps contemplating England’s exit from the World Cup...

Zelda Di Blasi on the placebo effect – the ghosts that haunt the house of biomedical objectivity.

Crocodile dung, lozenges of dried vipers, blisters and bloodletting. Until this century most medications were pharmacologically inert, if not harmful. Since the age of the scientific revolution...

Katy Tapper, Pauline J. Horne and C. Fergus Lowe describe an innovative scheme to get children to eat their fruit and veg.

CHILDREN don’t like fresh fruit and vegetables. Visit any primary school canteen and you will probably see them tucking into chips, sausages, baked beans and sponge pudding. The school cook will...

Nigel Foreman (Chair, International Committee) introduces a new series of occasional articles on psychology beyond the UK. Then Klaus Helkama and Nigel Foreman look at a country with one of the highest density of psychologists in the world.

In a sense, psychology in the UK is international; the roots of the British empirical tradition are traceable to the 19th-century laboratories of Germany, and much current literature emanates from...

Roger Lamb and Mary Sissons Joshi pay tribute to social psychologist Michael Argyle, who died on 6 September.

PROFESSOR Michael Argyle was arguably the most internationally respected British social psychologist. He did more than any other individual in the UK to define the scope of social psychology, and...

At the Annual Conference in Blackpool Vicki Bruce gave her Presidential Address on getting psychological research to the people who use it.

In this article I will argue that the UK Research Assessment Exercise, while useful in some respects, is in danger
of limiting the wider dissemination and application of research findings....

...Or do too many cooks spoil the broth? Rebecca Thompson investigates collaborative memory.

The common adages ‘Two heads are better than one’, ‘Many hands make light work’ and ‘Too many cooks spoil the broth’ highlight interesting patterns of human behaviour. They suggest that the...

The winner of the 2000 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology, Richard J. Crisp, describes his research on the potential of ‘multiple social categorisation’ in reducing prejudice.

IF you think of conflicts around the world, a common link emerges: in many cases they can be traced to differences in religion, ethnicity, or countless other bases for group membership. The...

Annette Karmiloff-Smith plays detective to unravel the genetic basis of Williams syndrome.

JAMES Watson’s contribution to the discovery of the structure of DNA in the 1950s and to the sequencing of the human genome half a century later cannot fail to excite all those fascinated by human...

Michelle Brown.

AS part of my course at the University of Bath, each student has to complete a mandatory 30-week placement in the third year. Having a strong interest in memory and a grandfather who suffered from...

Meg Barker considers news depictions of children as victims and perpetrators of ‘evil’ acts.

The popular press often focuses on crimes involving children – whether as victims or perpetrators. In recent years coverage has frequently reached ‘moral panic’ proportions in the UK, with...

Sheila Payne and Rebecca Haines describe the potential contribution of psychology to palliative care.

PSYCHOLOGISTS and others have long recognised that the experience of loss, especially through the death of important people in your life, represents a challenge (Bowlby, 1980; Parkes, 1996). Even...

Susan Golombok

IN 1976 I read an article in the feminist magazine Spare Rib that was to set me off on a research path that would occupy much of my working life for the next 25 years. The picture on the front of...

Ian Rivers, winner of the Society’s Award for Promoting Equality of Opportunity 2001, considers the social inclusion of lesbians and gay men.

IN his series of exchanges with fellow author Laurence Thomas, the American philosopher Michael Levin described his opposition to the introduction of legislation that would seek to criminalise...

John Coleman

ADOLESCENCE is without doubt the Cinderella subject within developmental psychology. It gets less attention than other topics in the textbooks, in the curriculum and on the research agenda. So why...

Howard Steele discusses whether attachment theory has kept pace with the changing family.

it was a bold claim, and one now familiar to most psychologists from their undergraduate days: that immediate and long-term benefits to mental health result if an ‘infant and young child should...

Arlene Vetere and Emilia Dowling, with Rita Harris, Renos Papadopoulos, Hitesh Raval and Bernadette Wren.

In writing this action plan on the changing family in the UK, we recruited some of the members of the Tavistock Clinic family systems team to help make practical recommendations, as if giving...