...features

W. Ray Crozier investigates the links between shyness and behavioural inhibition.

It is not difficult to conjure up an image of a shy child, tongue-tied and staring at the floor when asked a question by an adult; or hovering at the periphery of a game, perhaps peering from...

The Psychologist interviewed Pam Maras, Chair (formerly Director) of the Publications and Communications Board.

At the Annual Conference in Blackpool, Michael Billig questioned whether Freud’s analysis of jokes revealed his own repression.

‘Only joking’ – It’s one of the most common phrases in the language, frequently used when our attempts to be funny seem to be leading to problems. But can a joke be ‘just a joke’? Or is there much...

Nanette Mutrie on the relationship between exercise and psychological well-being.

The field of psychosomatic medicine has clearly established the idea that how we think and feel will affect the functioning of the body. What we do with our bodies may also affect how we think and...

Sandy Wolfson on the ethics and regulation of sport and exercise psychology.

Professional issues have featured prominently in the sport and exercise psychology literature for many years (e.g. see Nideffer, 1981). More recently a number of authors (see Andersen et al., 2000...

Jan Graydon looks beyond the yips and the jitters.

To any sportsperson the debilitative effects of high anxiety are only too familiar, and can range in severity from butterflies in the stomach to a full-blown panic attack. Over the years many...

John Kremer and David Lavallee introduce the special issue.

To many readers of The Psychologist, sport and exercise psychology must seem akin to the distant cousin that we sit beside at a family wedding – we know that she is somehow related but are not...

In the 12th annual Broadbent Lecture at the Annual Conference Dianne Berry outlined Broadbent’s explicit and implicit influences on psychological science and scientists.

In 1991 the Society launched the annual Broadbent Lecture series, with the inaugural lecture being given by Donald Broadbent himself. At the end of the lecture, which was published in The...

Jim McCourt met educational psychologists Jean Law, Elaine White and André Imich to discuss their innovative projects with schools.

School standards, pupil behaviour and pupil inclusion remain major issues for schools. To hear about creative research designed to tackle them, I met three educational psychologists in Essex –...

Ian M. Cockerill tells you how to clear the hurdles on your career path.

THE contributors to this special issue are an eclectic group.
‘Sport psychologist’ refers to a professional psychologist who works with individuals and teams in sport. But some are...

Do experts have a visual and cognitive advantage? Mark Williams reports.

Fostered by visions of favourite players and teams in action, the appeal of the study of expertise in sport is fuelled by the partisan nature of spectators and armchair fans. The scientific study...

Aidan Moran discusses mental imagery in sport: seeing, feeling and believing.

Many people believe that although sport is played with the body, it is won in the mind. Not surprisingly, sport performers increasingly turn to psychology in an effort to gain a ‘winning edge’...

Sharandeep Sanghara (undergraduate) and Laura Mitchell (postgraduate) with their winning essays on helping children with eating disorders and the pain-relieving properties of music.

Jim McCourt interviews Adrian Coyle.

Adrian Coyle is prolific. A senior lecturer at the University of Surrey with a PhD in social psychology, and joint director there of the practitioner doctorate in psychotherapy and counselling...

Sue Gardner (Ethics Committee), Pam Briggs and Camilla Herbert (Press Committee) seek your views on new challenges facing psychologists in the media.

THERE can be no doubt that in general the interaction between psychologists and the media has been beneficial to the discipline. But the celebrity article, PR company ‘surveys’, and TV programmes...

Gregory R. Maio gave his Spearman Medal Lecture at the Annual Conference in Blackpool. What happens when what you think you hold dear is questioned?

Social values, such as freedom, equality, and power, are often used as key premises for debate. For example, one individual may oppose abortion because it threatens the ‘sanctity of life’, whereas...

Kwame Owusu-Bempah and Dennis Howitt with their practical recommendations.

All social institutions, the BPS just as much as government, need to accept and deal with the complexity of modern populations. This includes much more than ‘race’: the needs of the powerless must...

According to Glyn V. Thomas, Graham Turpin
and Caroline Meyer, training clinical psychologists to doctoral standards has not prevented a decline in research.

It has been accepted for many years that clinical psychology courses should include training in clinically relevant research: the evidence–based ‘scientist-practitioner’ model remains central to...

Adrian Furnham on the role of psychology in understanding the dramatic rise of alternative therapies.

Research and royals, patients and politicians, counsellors and clinicians – all have recently taken a considerable interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Fringe, unconventional...

Jane Herlihy and John Gandy argue that neurological explanations do not make psychology redundant.

…a decade ago we used to have to go round talking about punitive toilet training... Now we truly understand that OCD [obsessive compulsive disorder] is a brain disorder. (Susan Swedo quoted in...

Jim McCourt spoke to Professor Barbara Wilson OBE, one of the winners of the BPS Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology 2000.

I interviewed Professor Barbara Wilson at the Oliver Zangwill Centre for Neuropsychological Rehabilitation at the Princess of Wales Hospital in Ely. She is Director here, after founding the...

Graham Towl, Head of Psychology for the Prison Service and the National Probation Service, on working towards an effective partnership.

THERE is a strong case for both the National Probation Service and HM Prison Service looking to areas of applied psychology to help deliver services in partnership. Forensic psychology is not the...

Last year, at the Centenary Conference in Glasgow, David Shapiro delivered the annual M.B. Shapiro Lecture in his father’s honour.

Clinical psychology, like the Society, is 100 years old. Throughout its life, clinical psychology has claimed a distinctive identity as a healthcare profession grounded in the science of...

Guest Editors Karen Ciclitira and Jane Weaver introduce the Psychology of Women Section’s special issue on the body.

The way the body is talked about, manipulated and represented, by scientists and in popular culture,
is of increasing interest to social psychologists. The body has also been of particular...

Trish Joscelyne argues for more clarity in the Society’s ethical codes

THE new government emphasis on quality assurance is gradually being felt within the working lives of psychologists. For those within higher education, both their research output and teaching are...