...features

Francine Shapiro and her eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing therapy have had their critics. But here, with Louise Maxfield, she argues that it is safe, rapid and effective.

Imagine a safe, rapid and effective treatment that results in the elimination of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). When I originally introduced eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (...

Peter Faire describes his experiences as the parent of a dyslexic child.

Having watched the educational progress of my dyslexic stepson over a long period, and having come into contact with others who also suffer at the hands of the ‘educational establishment’, I...

David Hardman and Clare Harries ask whether we need lessons in decision making.

IN the areas covered by other articles in this special issue, as well as in many other domains, a major concern is whether the thought processes involved are suitable for producing the best...

Terry M. Honess and Elizabeth A. Charman on how jurors process complex information and overcome pre-trial publicity.

SCEPTICISM about the ability of jurors (individually and collectively) to cope with the demands placed upon them is far from new. In a speech to the House of Lords in 1844 Lord Denman remarked: ‘...

A. John Maule and Gerard P. Hodgkinson discuss cognitive shortcuts in business.

STRATEGIC decisions concern the general direction taken by organisations over the medium- to long-term and are often the critical factor differentiating success from failure. Take the case of...

Clare Harries and David Hardman introduce the sepcial issue on judgement and decision making.

THE central theme of this special issue is the difference between the way in which we ought to make decisions and how we actually do make them. The area is behavioural decision research (BDR),...

Stephen Lea, Carole Burgoyne, Paul Webley and Brian Young offer practical recommendations for change on economic policy.

COMPARED with some branches of psychology, the concerns of the economic psychologist may seem mundane and a little lacking in mystique or theoretical depth. We are not ashamed of that; in fact we...

Rosemarie McCabe and Ethel Quayle assess the importance of insight into psychotic experience.

In mental health practice and research there is a growing user movement and a shift in how users of services are perceived. But despite this development, accounts of psychological distress are...

Anthony Little and David Perrett (winner of the 2000 Presidents’ Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Knowledge) discuss evolution and individual differences in face preference.

Our magazines and television screens are filled with images of ‘attractive’ people, and it is obvious that both women and men are highly concerned with good looks in a partner. But exactly what is...

Michael Argyle reviews psychological insights into religion, focusing on the Christian faith.

RELIGION presents a range of phenomena falling outside what is usually studied by psychologists, and for which there often appears to be no psychological explanation. Religious experiences are...

Neil Mercer

I HAVE had a special interest in the study of language and thinking ever since I was a student. One reason back then, perhaps, was that the ‘big names’ in the field seemed particularly colourful...

Peter Bull on how our bodies can speak volumes.

BELIEF in the importance of nonverbal communication is nothing new. ‘Not to watch
a person’s mouth but his fists’ was a celebrated aphorism of Martin Luther, the 16th century Protestant...

Paul Skirrow, Christina Jones, Richard D. Griffiths and Sue Kaney (Liverpool University’s Intensive Care Research Group) describe some of the little-known psychological consequences of a stay in intensive care.

INTENSIVE care units (ICUs) are facing increasing demands, partly as a result of the gradual ‘greying’ of the population in Great Britain. As a consequence, the provision of intensive care...

Personal space - Derek Milne.

VARYING approaches to research can come into conflict under the growing pressure to collaborate across organisational boundaries and to achieve high quality standards, making it necessary for...

Guest Editor Ray Bull introduces a special issue on the contribution of forensic psychology to helping the police get the truth...and nothing but the truth.

Articles:
Elizabeth Loftus on false memories.
Gisli Gudjonsson on false confessions.
Simona Ghetti and Gail S. Goodman on how children can reject misinformation.
Aldert...

Andrew Silke with his practical recommendations for preventing further atrocities.

ICOMPILED this article back in July, several weeks before the horrific events of 11 September. So it was somewhat surprising that even in the wake of the most destructive terrorist attacks in...

At the Centenary Annual Conference Jon Sutton described the work that won him the 1999 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology.

IN February 1996, 16-year-old Katherine Morrison killed herself. Two schoolmates, Shelley McBratney and Lee Ann Murray, were put on trial for common assault. In the eyes of many, they were being...

David Pilgrim and David Hewitt discuss the practical and legal implications of the proposed ‘clinical supervisor’ role.

SOME readers of The Psychologist, or their friends or relatives, will have psychiatric treatment or admission imposed on them at some time in their lives. With their professional hat on,...

Is a bat conscious? Susan Blackmore argues that there must be something radically wrong with the way we are currently thinking about consciousness, or we would not find ourselves with seemingly intractable problems.

WHAT is it like to be a bat? This is the question asked by philosopher Thomas Nagel in his famous 1974 paper. As he explains, if there is something it is like to be the bat – something for the bat...

Is the internet a safe communication environment for socially anxious individuals, or does it in fact increase social isolation?
Robin-Marie Shepherd and Robert J. Edelmann report.

THE past decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the use of the internet; a recent estimate suggests that there are over 400 million internet users worldwide (Nua Internet Surveys, 2001) with...

Amanda Waterman, Mark Blades and Christopher Spencer ask nonsensical questions – but their research has serious implications for anyone who interviews children.

ASK one of your colleagues whether a jumper was angrier than a tree, and they might well suggest you go and have a lie down, or make yourself a nice cup of tea. But what if you asked a child?...

David Lykken and Mike Csikszentmihalyi debate the impact
of genetic factors on happiness.

David Lykken - Your average level of subjective well-being or happiness is largely determined by your genes. So if happiness is strongly genetic, that suggests that it must run in families – but...

Tommy MacKay gave his Presidential Address at April’s Centenary Conference in Glasgow.

IF you are giving a Presidential Address at the largest gathering of psychologists ever to be held in Britain, and it is to be published to the 34,000 members of the Society in addition to being a...

At the 2000 London Conference Glyn Humphreys gave his Presidents’ Award Lecture on the cognitive neuroscience of action selection.

IN everyday life we carry out many hundreds of visually guided actions on the objects that surround us. We may reach and grasp a kettle and pour boiling water from it into a teapot; we may pour...

John Archer describes a rich research agenda for evolutionary psychology in testing novel hypotheses. Peer commentaries by Robin Dunbar, Anne Campbell, Lynn Segal, David Buss, and Hilary and Steven Rose.

OVER a relatively short period of time evolutionary psychology has become a prominent way of understanding the human mind and behaviour. Its origins lie in a number of theoretical analyses of...