...features

Could a simple exercise routine significantly improve the reading of dyslexic children? Angus Smyth caught up with Martin McPhillips to find out more about the technique.

There is gentleness about Martin McPhillips. He leads me into his office where the pale-green walls are lined with photographs of children performing their routine of primary reflex movements. ‘...

David Giles.

I KNOW it’s customary, and perhaps clichéd, to start off these ‘Why I study’ articles with an autobiographical anecdote, but I can indeed vividly recall the moment I decided to return to academia...

Paul Kennedy and Susan Llewelyn investigate views on the integration of research and practice in clinical psychology.

Clinical psychology, like other branches of psychology, has seen many changes over the past 50 years. Most obviously there have been substantial increases in numbers, but there have also been...

Richard Henson, winner of the 1998 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology.

How do we maintain a novel sequence of items in the correct order? For example, how do we remember the car number plate at the scene of a crime? Or how do we remember an unfamiliar telephone...

Peter Fonagy assesses evidence for the effectiveness of psychoanalytic treatment.

At first we hope too much, later on, not enough. (Joseph Roux, Meditations of a Parish Priest, 1886)
In 1903, in his contribution to Loewenfeld’s book on obsessional phenomena, Freud wrote:...

Mark Solms on dreaming in the neuropsychological age.

In 1953 a physiological state known as ‘REM sleep’ was discovered by Aserinsky and Kleitman (1953).
This is a paradoxical state in which one is simultaneously highly aroused and yet fast...

Chris R. Brewin and Bernice Andrews uncover parallels between repression and modern cognitive theories of forgetting

For many years the central role accorded to mechanisms of psychological defence was one of the characteristics that divided psychoanalytic theory and therapy from behavioural and cognitive...

Mick Power delves into the unconscious and finds several of Freud’s ideas alive and well.

Many people believe that Freud discovered the unconscious, while the more cynical would even claim that he invented it. However, the magnificent history of the subject — The Discovery of the...

James Reason on unconscious urges and cognitive cock-ups.

We should begin by reminding ourselves of what Freud actually said about slips and lapses. He was rarely one to mince his words. ‘A suppression of a previous intention to say something is the...

Susan M. Andersen and Regina Miranda argue that transference is a normal, everyday process.

Our research addresses the clinical concept of transference, and shows that Freud got it partly right. In fact, transference is not confined to the psychiatrist’s couch: it is at work in our...

Guest Editors Bernice Andrews and Chris R. Brewin introduce a special issue on Freudian theory in the light of modern research.

The last quarter of the 20th century has seen growing academic criticism of, and public scepticism about, Freudian theory and practice. With very few exceptions (e.g. Eysenck, 1986) it is notable...

John Wilding, Susan Cook and Josh Davis present some curious findings from the field of ‘earwitness’ testimony.

IN 1935 Bruno Hauptmann was convicted of the kidnapping and murder of the infant son of the aviator Charles Lindbergh in the United States. Lindbergh claimed that Hauptmann’s voice matched that of...

Stephen E. G. Lea introduces the Society’s new guidelines for psychologists working with animals.

OVER 20 years ago, the Society published its first guidance on the use of animals in psychology, in the form of a working party report. That working party grew into the Society’s Standing Advisory...

In the 1999 Spearman Medal Lecture Simon Killcross discussed the complex role of this influential part of the brain.

For many years the amygdala has been implicated in emotional processing. More recently its importance to our everyday psychology has been highlighted in the popular science press and in books such...

Mary Dalgleish discusses the role of occupational psychologists in the Employment Service.

‘An insightful senior manager once observed that psychologists in commercial organisations are like bidets. They add class but no one is quite sure if they are using them correctly.’ (Acker et al...

Adrian Furnham looks at research on lay theories of intelligence and sex differences in estimated intelligence.

Few topics in psychology engender as much popular attention and conjecture as intelligence and intelligence testing. Academics have lost their jobs and their reputations for holding unpopular...

Chloe Smith turns the tables on Freud to give her personal analysis of his motives

THROUGHOUT his life and until the present day, Freud has been both applauded and criticised by a catalogue of scholars and numerous dinner party guests. Freud wanted fame and he has got it. The...

In the C.S. Myers Lecture at the Society’s Annual Conference in 2000, Stephen E.G. Lea asked ‘If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich?. 

John Raven expresses concern over the widening gap between the routinised application of ethical codes and the true seriousness of the ethical dilemmas faced by our profession.

At a recent Society meeting on the future of occupational psychology concern was expressed about a seemingly widening gap between the routinised application of ethical codes and the true...

Lynn B. Myers explores repression: what it is, how it’s done and what it might mean for psychological research and for repressors themselves.

DO you have friends or colleagues who turn up early for meetings, never seem to forget anything, are always polite and do not lose their temper? The probability is that they possess a repressive...

In her 2000 Presidential Address Pat Frankish reflected on the need for a ‘hearts and minds’ approach to change.

Thought and feeling — it seems the link between the two has been the focus of all my work as a psychologist, and of considerable interest to researchers in our premier establishments. But why did...

Derek Mitchell and James Blair argue that psychopaths lack the ‘music of emotion’.

ONE of the first things to strike you when you begin to work with psychopathic individuals is the clear discordance between the way that they verbalise emotion and the way that they appear to...

Menna Jones, the winner in the postgraduate category, argues for a psychological explanation of bipolar disorder.
Alex Linley, the winner in the undergraduate category, discusses the relationship between adversity and success.

Jones - MOST of us know the occasional experience of unpredictable moods, mood swings and changes in our own thoughts and behaviour that can happen quickly and for no apparent external reason....

Peter K. Smith

‘BRITAIN is the bullying capital of Europe’. Newspaper headlines like this appeared in late 1989, shortly after I had started research on school bullying and reported findings on its extent. The...

Mark H. Johnson looks at babies’ cognitive and brain development and describes how they actively contribute to the construction of their own brain.

IS it a valuable investment in the future to provide ‘enriched’ environments for young infants, as suggested at a meeting in 1997 convened by Bill and Hillary Clinton? Is it worthwhile attempting...