...features

Christopher C. French

A FEW months ago I received an e-mail from a mature student wondering if I could explain various terrifying experiences that she had endured repeatedly for almost 20 years. On exchanging a few e-...

Jim Horne discusses the latest research on sleep, dreaming and sleep deprivation.

FOR me, one of the greatest mysteries of sleep is why so few psychologists seem to be interested in the subject. Sleep occupies so much of our time that it is arguably the commonest form of human...

Rea Reason, a winner of the 2000 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology, sets out the Society’s position on dyslexia.

THE concept of dyslexia is relevant not only to education but to several areas of psychological research and practice. In cognitive psychology it has for many years been shorthand for marked...

Jim McCourt caught up with Craig Newnes, Director of Psychological Therapies for Shropshire’s Community and Mental Health Trust, to hear an alternative perspective on research in clinical psychology.

RADICAL and forthright, Craig Newnes offers a refreshing and alternative perspective on research in clinical psychology, epitomising the notions of free thought and innovation. He is based in...

Michael J.A. Howe

WHEN a journalist recently asked me to account for my interest in geniuses, all I could think to say was ‘They are just fascinating: doesn’t everyone find geniuses interesting?’ On reflection, I...

Ed Cairns with his practical recommendations
for ending war and promoting peace.

IN today’s media-conscious world psychologists are not known for their reticence to pronounce on matters of public interest. There is one field, however, where psychologists have been unduly...

MARK GRIFFITHS on the advantages and disadvantages of providing psychological services on the internet.

A 27 - year old man comes home from a busy day at work feeling highly stressed and anxious. Unable to relax, he logs on to the internet, locates a self-help site for stress and anxiety and fills...

KATE NATION gave her Spearman Medal Lecture at the London Conference in December.

There's no doubt that learning to read is a complicated business. The first lesson children must learn is that English is an alphabetic language – letters and groups of letters map on to...

Andrew Scholey on research of the Human Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, University of Northumbria, using supply and demand in the brain to improve cognitive performance.

MOST of us accept that the capacity for exercise can be enhanced by increasing the delivery of glucose or oxygen to muscles. Could the same principles be applied to brain function? At the Human...

Jonathan Freeman, Jane Lessiter and Wijnand IJsselsteijn provide an introduction to ‘presence’ –
a sense of being there – based on the research of the Immersive Television Project at Goldsmiths College.

THE scene from the future opposite is imaginary, have no doubt; but the basic concept behind it is real. Psychologists are helping in the development of media systems that can generate a sense of...

Jenny Firth-Cozens

ON the face of it there seemed to be very good reasons back in 1983 to start a study of doctors. Although a clinician, I was working at the Social and Applied Psychology Unit at the University of...

Robert Plomin argues that psychologists should prepare to maximise the benefits and minimise the risks that will emerge from DNA research.
Commentaries are provided by Martin Richards, Jonathan Flint, Steven Rose, Anita Thapar and Jane Holmes, Theresa Marteau and Andrew Wilkie.

ASK any psychologist to complete the following phrase: ‘nature–nurture _________’.
The answer will no doubt be ‘debate’ or ‘controversy’. But the controversy that swirled around behavioural...

Founded in 1998, the Depersonalisation Research Unit at the Institute of Psychiatry was the first in its field. Now the team describe their progress in the development of cognitive-behavioural and pharmacological treatments.

Depersonalisation is a psychiatric condition characterised by an alteration in the perception and experience of the self (Mellor, 1988). It was first described in the scientific literature over...

Could a simple exercise routine significantly improve the reading of dyslexic children? Angus Smyth caught up with Martin McPhillips to find out more about the technique.

There is gentleness about Martin McPhillips. He leads me into his office where the pale-green walls are lined with photographs of children performing their routine of primary reflex movements. ‘...

David Giles.

I KNOW it’s customary, and perhaps clichéd, to start off these ‘Why I study’ articles with an autobiographical anecdote, but I can indeed vividly recall the moment I decided to return to academia...

Paul Kennedy and Susan Llewelyn investigate views on the integration of research and practice in clinical psychology.

Clinical psychology, like other branches of psychology, has seen many changes over the past 50 years. Most obviously there have been substantial increases in numbers, but there have also been...

Richard Henson, winner of the 1998 Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology.

How do we maintain a novel sequence of items in the correct order? For example, how do we remember the car number plate at the scene of a crime? Or how do we remember an unfamiliar telephone...

Peter Fonagy assesses evidence for the effectiveness of psychoanalytic treatment.

At first we hope too much, later on, not enough. (Joseph Roux, Meditations of a Parish Priest, 1886)
In 1903, in his contribution to Loewenfeld’s book on obsessional phenomena, Freud wrote:...

Mark Solms on dreaming in the neuropsychological age.

In 1953 a physiological state known as ‘REM sleep’ was discovered by Aserinsky and Kleitman (1953).
This is a paradoxical state in which one is simultaneously highly aroused and yet fast...

Chris R. Brewin and Bernice Andrews uncover parallels between repression and modern cognitive theories of forgetting

For many years the central role accorded to mechanisms of psychological defence was one of the characteristics that divided psychoanalytic theory and therapy from behavioural and cognitive...

Mick Power delves into the unconscious and finds several of Freud’s ideas alive and well.

Many people believe that Freud discovered the unconscious, while the more cynical would even claim that he invented it. However, the magnificent history of the subject — The Discovery of the...

James Reason on unconscious urges and cognitive cock-ups.

We should begin by reminding ourselves of what Freud actually said about slips and lapses. He was rarely one to mince his words. ‘A suppression of a previous intention to say something is the...

Susan M. Andersen and Regina Miranda argue that transference is a normal, everyday process.

Our research addresses the clinical concept of transference, and shows that Freud got it partly right. In fact, transference is not confined to the psychiatrist’s couch: it is at work in our...

Guest Editors Bernice Andrews and Chris R. Brewin introduce a special issue on Freudian theory in the light of modern research.

The last quarter of the 20th century has seen growing academic criticism of, and public scepticism about, Freudian theory and practice. With very few exceptions (e.g. Eysenck, 1986) it is notable...

Stephen E. G. Lea introduces the Society’s new guidelines for psychologists working with animals.

OVER 20 years ago, the Society published its first guidance on the use of animals in psychology, in the form of a working party report. That working party grew into the Society’s Standing Advisory...