...features

David Dunning with some fascinating studies into how and why we are deluded about the self.

Ninety per cent of the world’s woe comes from people not knowing themselves, their abilities, their frailties, and even their real virtues. Most of us go almost all the way through life as...

Ninna Makrinov, Judith Scharager and Rogelio Diaz with the latest in our international series.

Chile is a sparsely populated country in South America, at the ‘end of the world’. Despite having an area of around three times the UK, its population is only just over 15 million. It
is...

Christian Jarrett on psychology’s place in new architectural development.

THE space around us affects us profoundly – emotionally, behaviourally, cognitively. In Britain that space is changing at a pace not seen for a generation – over one million homes to be built by...

Peter Farrell, Kevin Woods, Sarah Lewis,
Steve Rooney, Garry Squires and Mike O'Connor discuss the implications of a government-funded review of the work of educational psychologists

The Government’s ‘Every Child Matters’ (ECM) legislation constitutes a major national strategic initiative in the improvement of services provided to children and families (DfES, 2004). The ECM...

Laura Golding and Ian Gray look at the what, why and how.

From October, chartered members of the British Psychological Society face the possibility of having their practising certificates withheld if they do not produce the appropriate evidence of...

Freud understood that remembering is motivated by goals and nonconscious processes. Martin A. Conway reflects on his ideas.

Memories are curious things. Sometimes they masquerade as thoughts, feelings, or images, without revealing themselves as memories. Sometimes they come to mind and seem relatively meaningless,...

Mick Power on theoretical and practical influences.

Freud, and the general domain of psychoanalytic thought, have always been controversial. In our lifetime, much of the attack on psychoanalysis has come from within psychology; in particular, on...

Wendy Hollway on how Freud has influenced her thinking on theory and method.

I’m increasingly impressed with how radical a thinker Freud was, now that I appreciate what it takes to excavate anxiety-provoking experience for the purposes of understanding. Freud identified...

Stephen Frosh on the tension between order and disorder in his and Freud’s careers.

It’s funny to reflect on how I became attached to the ‘idea’ of Freud. These days I’m engrossed in questions of identity and otherness, in both psychosocial and psychoanalytic terms. This has led...

Michael Billig with his personal reflections.

During the 1950s and early 1960s the image of the psychologist in popular culture was that of a psychoanalyst – usually male, bearded and speaking with a heavy accent. When I went off to study...

Mark Solms on a perhaps unlikely alliance.

I trained in neuropsychology in the early 1980s. At that time (even more than today) the field was dominated by cognitive theory and methods. We learned a great deal about the manner in which the...

Simon Baron-Cohen on Freud’s place in present and future research.

Empathy has been a central focus of my research over the last 20 years. In my early work, I considered just one ‘fraction’ of empathy, namely ‘theory of mind’ (ToM), or the ability to attribute...

Brian Rock and Peter Fonagy introduce this special issue, marking the 150th anniversary of Freud’s birth.

Ayla Humphrey examines the development of a child neuropsychology service in an unusual setting.

WHEN he was six years old, Jay’s mother brought him to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). His school had encouraged her to get help for Jay because in the classroom he was having...

Elizabeth Jefferies describes the research on short-term memory that won her the Society’s Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology.

The classic example of verbal short-term memory is keeping a telephone number in mind as we dial it, but this cognitive ability plays a critical role in many other everyday activities including...

Stephen Scott wraps up the special issue.

In the UK, now is a good time to be a psychologist aiming to help families with difficult children. In the last decade there has been a shift from clinic-based services that simply wait to see who...

Judy Hutchings and Eleanor Lane on how to engage the high-risk families.

The government is finally recognising the large and growing problem of pathways to criminality, and is seeking solutions. Money has been pumped into programmes such as Sure Start, to support...

Matthew R. Sanders and Alina Morawska on the importance of parenting, and properly assessing interventions.

AS Sutton and colleagues described in the previous article, there are various parenting, school and community, and personal factors at play in determining a child’s risk of developing serious...

In the first of our articles, Carole Sutton, David Utting and David Farrington look at the evidence for the early origins of antisocial behaviour.

There is now a wealth of evidence, summarised in the illustration opposite, that the roots of offending, mental health difficulties and failure to reach cognitive potential are often evident from...

Philip Treleaven, Adrian Furnham and Viren Swami on a new area with implications for psychological research.

Your body shape and language contain a wealth of personal information that has a major influence on your life. Now 3D photo-booths are able to instantaneously capture
a highly accurate...

Craig Aaen-Stockdale, winner in the postgraduate category, on how psychologists have found their playful side to shed light on the plasticity of the brain.

The work of modern psychologists and neuroscientists is now almost universally informed by the idea that the mind is a product of the physical brain (and anybody taking a different line probably...

As the Society publishes a new report, Christian Jarrett takes a look at causes and treatments.

TO many, the term personality disorder (PD) has become synonymous with stigma and confusion. It’s said that if psychologists cannot agree on what exactly personality is or how to measure it, then...

John White considers the roots of a fundamental psychological concept.

In the latest in our ‘Eye on fiction’ series, Charles Fernyhough looks at how novelists have reflected scientific understanding of the mind.

Like any science, psychology depends on making links from the known to the unknown. Throughout the history of psychology, metaphors have proved an invaluable way of gaining purchase on the...

Daniel B. Wright, James Ost and Christopher C. French look at how the evidence has developed since the Society’s working party report.

In 1995 the recovered memory debate was near its most vociferous height. Hundreds of people were recovering memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), sometimes in therapies where it was believed...