...features

Menna Jones, the winner in the postgraduate category, argues for a psychological explanation of bipolar disorder.
Alex Linley, the winner in the undergraduate category, discusses the relationship between adversity and success.

Jones - MOST of us know the occasional experience of unpredictable moods, mood swings and changes in our own thoughts and behaviour that can happen quickly and for no apparent external reason....

Peter K. Smith

‘BRITAIN is the bullying capital of Europe’. Newspaper headlines like this appeared in late 1989, shortly after I had started research on school bullying and reported findings on its extent. The...

Mark H. Johnson looks at babies’ cognitive and brain development and describes how they actively contribute to the construction of their own brain.

IS it a valuable investment in the future to provide ‘enriched’ environments for young infants, as suggested at a meeting in 1997 convened by Bill and Hillary Clinton? Is it worthwhile attempting...

Judy Dunn reveals the illuminating perspectives
offered by the study of what are, for most people,
their longest-lasting relationships.

Most of us grow up with brothers and sisters — the figure is around 80 per cent for people in the UK and the US. And our relationships with our siblings are the longest-lasting we’ll probably have...

I USED to be a worried social psychologist, fretting that I wasn’t where the action was. I’d collect people’s views on unemployment or their opinions about their friends. I’d get them to fill in...

Barrie Gunter argues that TV ratings systems
may be based on an incomplete understanding of audience psychology.

The rapid growth of television channels following the launch of cable, satellite and digital transmission systems has created a fresh challenge for viewers. How, given a much expanded programme...

John Sheppard interviews Tony Gale, who this month finishes as the Society’s Honorary General Secretary, on his time in office and his view of recent changes in the Society’s structure and functioning.

‘The Honorary General Secretary’s position is exceptionally powerful and there is a need to trim it.’ This forthright statement comes not from one who opposes the present incumbent, nor even from...

Stephen Newstead gives a psychological perspective on recent developments in higher education. This article is an abridged version of his Award for Distinguished Contributions to
the Teaching of Psychology lecture at the Society’s London Conference, December 1999.

British higher education has undergone major changes in recent years. These changes include: the modularisation and semesterisation of courses; increased participation rate; changes in the profile...

David Messer looks at the continuing controversies.

Many would argue that using language is an ability unique to humans. It is a central component to all our lives and is especially important in allowing children to learn so much and so extensively...

John Sheppard interviews Colin Newman, who is retiring after two decades as the Society’s Executive Secretary.

COLIN Newman is the Society; the Society is Colin Newman. This is how many, both within and outside the Society, see things. The Society’s Executive Secretary for the best part of 20 years, his...

Margaret A. Boden explores how computers can help us understand human creativity.

You may already be foaming at the mouth. Merely reading the title may have infuriated you: ‘What nonsense,’ you may be thinking, ‘Computers can’t really be creative!’Well, maybe they can’t. But...

Philip Banyard and Nigel Hunt analyse what is missing from the method sections of British psychology journals.

ARE we telling the full story in our research reports? Do the journals of the British Psychological Society give full accounts of procedure in their method sections? And is our research still...

Guest Editor Graham Beaumont introduces a special issue on clinical neuropsychology.

Neuropsychology is the scientific study of the relationship between the brain and mental life; clinical neuropsychology, of those aspects concerning the psychological assessment, management and...

The new millennium does not, strictly speaking, begin until 1 January 2001. But it’s clear that in the public’s view the change in the calendar from 1999 to 2000 is the big psychological event.
So here we present some thoughts from various perspectives on why many people see the year 2000 as so significant …

Barbara A. Wilson

What is it about the study of brain injury that grabbed my interest in my student days and continues to intrigue me? I know that the division between normality and abnormality, and the frail...

John Sheppard interviewed Jeffrey Gray of
the Institute of Psychiatry just before his ‘retirement’.

‘JEFFREY Gray retires soon — he would be interesting to interview!’ said our Editor. So off I went to the Institute of Psychiatry at Denmark Hill, London, and found I had been slightly misled....

Roz Shafran gave the first Award for outstanding doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology Lecture at the Society’s Annual Conference in Belfast in April.

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder that is estimated to affect 1–3 per cent of the population, although the true prevalence remains unknown (Antony et al., 1998). Most...

Andy Smith

MY interest in the psychology of the common cold was triggered in 1982 over lunch with Donald Broadbent and David Tyrrell, then Director of the MRC Common Cold Unit in Salisbury.
I was...

David Rose and Nigel Foreman describe the application to psychology of a fast-developing new technology.

WHAT we now know as virtual reality (VR) had its origins in the development of ‘visually coupled’ systems (Kalawsky, 1993), which formed the basis of the first flight simulators. This is a...

Personal space - Glyn Hudson-Allez

Working as a counselling psychologist in primary care, I have noticed over the years an increasing number of middle-aged clients presenting with stress or depression or both with no specific life...

Francesca Happé gave the Spearman Medal Lecture at the Society’s London Conference in December 1998.
She argued that we can discover more about autism through examples of task success than of failure — and that it involves a distinct cognitive style, rather than deficit.

AUTISM is a devastating developmental disorder, affecting at least one in a thousand children and adults. Although biologically based, with a strong genetic component, diagnosis of autism is still...

Richard Hammersley describes some recorded message styles.

As we all get busier, an answering machine can ensure that we only have to accept calls when we want to. I still know a few people who panic and hang up whenever they hear a recorded message, but...

Personal Space - Golda Smith

WHY are educational psychologists considered
to be able to make useful contributions that assist learning in pre-school environments, primary and secondary education but generally not in...

Guest Editor Bryan Roche introduces a special feature on modern behaviour analysis.

MODERN-day behaviour analysis is a far cry from the behaviourism popularised by John B. Watson earlier this century. Indeed, modern behaviour analysis even builds upon
and extends the...

In her 1999 Presidential Address, Ingrid Lunt
outlined her belief in the Society’s ability to draw strength from the many facets of the discipline of psychology.

THE Society has a complex structure. It has survived for almost 100 years, reacting to expansion and gaining accretions without radical change to its fundamental structure. With more than 30,000...