...features

Daniel B. Wright, James Ost and Christopher C. French look at how the evidence has developed since the Society’s working party report.

In 1995 the recovered memory debate was near its most vociferous height. Hundreds of people were recovering memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), sometimes in therapies where it was believed...

Willem Kuyken on the phenomenon of overgeneralised autobiographical memory in depression.

Think of a personal quality that is important to you, perhaps one that defines you in some way. Now try to think of a specific memory, a particular time and place that demonstrates this quality....

At this year’s Annual Conference, Padraic Monaghan delivered the Spearman Medal Lecture on an unusual way of studying hemispheric specialisation.

On opening up the top of your head, one of the most striking features of the brain’s structure is that it is divided into two hemispheres. Delving further, you will notice that the two hemispheres...

Damien W. Riggs and Precilla Y. L. Choi examine the role of privilege in research and practice.

Psychological research has often focused on the effects of racism and (less often) heterosexism upon marginalised groups. However, a brief survey of the literature suggests that we have seldom...

Roger Paxton on changes and implications for academic and applied psychologists.

The purpose of the NHS is to improve the health of the population, so why does the NHS fund research? The reason, explicit on the Department of Health website, is to provide the knowledge base so...

Anna Costin with the latest in our international series.

Andy Young

THE truth is that I’ve been doing it so long, I’m not sure I can really remember why I started. But I’m really glad that I stumbled into this area of research.
I do recall that the stumbling...

Chris Olivers, winner of the Society’s Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research Contributions to Psychology, on the attentional control of dynamic stimuli.

The modern world is designed to capture our attention. Traffic lights, flashing phones, moving banners, and brightly coloured billboards depicting happy faces and sensual bodies – all attempt to...

Aoife O’Donovan and Brian M. Hughes find that the effects of social support on health aren’t as straightforward as they at first seem.

‘I’M afraid you’re suffering from a lack of social support,’ said the physician in a grave tone. ‘Consequences of this malady include heart disease, complications during pregnancy and childbirth,...

It’s the Society’s ‘Year of Reducing Conflict’, but John Kremer and Ian Schermbrucker believe that shouldn’t always be our goal.

In February 2004 David Goodhart wrote a provocative piece for Prospect magazine entitled ‘Too diverse’. The article questioned whether Britain was becoming too diverse to sustain ‘a good society...

Gareth Hagger-Johnson, Jim McManus, Craig Hutchison and Meg Barker with some recommendations.

Psychologists should consider their relationship with the voluntary and community sectors (VCS). Here we outline the potential returns for all when collaborating, and the potential consequences of...

Emma Flynn , Karen Pine and Charlie Lewis argue for a powerful psychological technique.

Stephen Reicher and S. Alexander Haslam discuss results from their BBC Prison Study.

Sarah Riley, Hannah Frith, Louise Archer and Louise Veseley discuss women in psychology and The Psychologist.

Noting that there were fewer submissions to The Psychologist by women, the Psychologist Policy Committee asked us, via the Standing Committee for the Promotion of Equal Opportunities, to comment....

Educational failure is the root of many social problems; Sonia Jackson and Peter McParlin believe psychologists can help.

Children who grow up in local authority care, ‘looked after’ under the Children Act 1989, are four times more likely than others to require the help of mental health services; nine times more...

P. Alex Linley and Susan Harrington discuss academic and applied perspectives on strengths psychology.

What are your strengths? In everyday conversation people are generally modest and reluctant to talk about their strengths. When asked this question in an interview, most people feel slightly...

David Giles and John Maltby examine the current state of psychological research on celebrities and those who ‘worship’ them.

Imagine for a moment that you are famous. How different would your life be? For a start, you would be incredibly powerful. Feel hungry? Don’t bother walking to the shop to buy some lunch – you...

Catherine Butler, Lyndsey Moon and Meg Barker introduce the special issue. Alex Accoroni on some common misconceptions that can hinder a straight therapist in their work with LGB clients. Lyndsey Moon on sexual scripts and the language of difference.

Peter Bull with a contribution to the Society’s theme for the year – ‘Reducing conflict’.

Sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland has often been described in terms of a clash of identities between the Protestant British, who wish to remain part of the United Kingdom, and the Irish...

Jolanda Jetten, winner of the Society’s Spearman Medal 2004, outlines her research.

Just imagine: Your boss asks you to run a series of special training days
for other employees. At first you feel rather flattered that your boss is considering you for this task. But you...

Personal space - Ian Hodges and Jim McManus call for psychologists to be more proactive in challenging homophobia and sexual prejudice.
Speaking of sexual politics in psychology - a discussion between Peter Hegarty and David Hardman.
Myra J. Hird on what psychologists can learn from the huge range of non-human design and behaviour.
Meg Barker: Why I study...Bisexuality and beyond

Jim Cromwell on some tricky problems psychologists can face testing deaf people who use sign language.

Bob is a builder. He has been working for 40 years, and his tools have become extra limbs rather than inanimate aids. He has whole areas of cortex dedicated to plastering. Last month he returned...

John Marzillier with the latest in our series of psychological perspectives on fiction – and perhaps fictional perspectives on psychology.

In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel Tender is the Night, the charismatic psychiatrist Dick Diver falls for a beautiful heiress, Nicole Warren. He marries her but they don’t live happily ever after. Why...

Nobody likes you… what now? Roy Baumeister describes some surprising experimental effects, in the final contribution for the Society’s ‘Year of Relationships’.

‘The tribe has spoken.’ ‘You’re fired.’ ‘You may now leave the Big Brother house.’ The language and storylines of reality television focus relentlessly on rejection. Apparently the spectacle of...

Frank Tallis on Freud, Vienna, and the centenary of a landmark publication.

It has been one hundred years since the publication of Freud’s Three Essays on The Theory of Sexuality. Many would argue – with some justification – that it is the most important work of...