death

Facebook, Twitter and Instagram might pride themselves on connecting people, but should this extend beyond a person’s lifetime? Psychologist Elaine Kasket tackles the issues most important to us – privacy, identity, legacy, memory and love. This new book tells the stories...

If you’re taking a plane to Ireland from an English airport, you’ll find that you start your descent at right about the moment you reach cruising altitude. Arriving at your destination, you will hardly experience a revelation to the senses – architecturally, topographically...

Beverley was made MBE in 2016 for services to nursing, and in particular her contribution to child-adult transitional care. She was interviewed here by Alexandra Tyler, a second-year trainee clinical psychologist at Plymouth University, about her holistic and psychologically...

‘With the End in Mind’ is a book of stories written for lay readers, but I hope the book distils ‘essence of palliative care’ for fellow professionals, too. The power of stories is that the story-teller can hold our hand, even as we walk into the scary places.

This...

When did you first get interested in the role of digital and social media in supporting bereaved students?
I have been following the role that social media has had in dealing with illness, death, grief, and tragedy since social media became popular… I...

One person’s influence upon the earth’s environment is necessarily limited but nonetheless crucial. Average yearly temperatures are rising; and, for our species to survive, although our abilities are modest, our ambition must be enormous. None of us can solve the problem of...

What has surprised you most about your journeys into the grey zone?
Working with people in the grey zone – and by that, I mean patients who hover at the border between life and death – I’ve been surprised by many things over the years, but perhaps most...

In the 2015 Quality of Death index the UK was ranked best in the world, but despite this inequalities and discrimination towards the LGBT community still occur too regularly. British Psychological Society Lifetime Achievement Award winner...

This engaging book takes us on a personal journey with a doctor, reflecting on the meaning of death, both within his personal life, but also as a construct within an overburdened hospital system, one often said to leave clinicians pressured to offer ongoing treatment to frail...

In society we still prefer children to be seen, and not sad, and we find films like A Monster Calls hard to watch. It forces us to confront the all too real experience for 50,000 newly bereaved children each year in the UK. 

This thought-provoking film brings...