fiction

In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel Tender is the Night, the charismatic psychiatrist Dick Diver falls for a beautiful heiress, Nicole Warren. He marries her but they don’t live happily ever after. Why not? One reason is that Nicole has a secret: she is subject to bouts of madness...

Like any science, psychology depends on making links from the known to the unknown. Throughout the history of psychology, metaphors have proved an invaluable way of gaining purchase on the unobservables of human cognition. Indeed, a history of metaphors of mind might look...

Partly motivated by his increasing brushes with psychosis, by the early 1970s the science fiction author Philip K. Dick was struggling with increasing doubts over the nature of reality and personal identity. Perhaps unsurprisingly, characters with unstable worlds and...

People spend a good deal of their free time on novels, plays, films and television dramas. What are they up to? Being entertained, perhaps. But is there more to it? Maja Djikic, Raymond Mar and I have been working together to understand the psychological effects of engaging...

The development of cognitive psychology is typically fostered through the study of groups of participants placed in varied, and often imaginative, experimental situations. More rarely, some research topics require a single subject. This type of study can be found in research...

The vaulting ambition of modern science is to achieve mastery through total explanation, but in three realms it continues to be frustrated by mystery: the macro, the micro and inner consciousness. Physicists hope their Large Hadron Collider might help to ‘solve’ conundrums...

It is easy to forget how mysterious and mighty stories are. They do their work in silence, invisibly. They work with all the internal materials of the mind and self. They become part of you while changing you. Beware the stories you read or tell: subtly, at night, beneath the...

Author Maurice Sendak once said: ‘I only have one subject. The question I am obsessed with is How do children survive?’ (Marcus, 2002, pp.170–171).

According to the writer Francis Spufford, Where the Wild Things Are is ‘one of the very few picture...

It has been said that all delusions by their very nature are bizarre (Ellis & Lewis, 2001). However, perhaps none are more bizarre than the delusional misidentification syndrome known as Capgras syndrome (CS), the belief that significant others are no longer who they say...